Is Saks Taking A Giant Leap Backwards By Splitting Off E-Commerce?

More From Forbes

Further Covid-19 Restrictions Looming, Coperni Fuels Paris Fashion Week With Hope”,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”Further Covid-19 Restrictions Looming, Coperni Fuels Paris Fashion Week With Hope”,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/roxannerobinson/2021/03/05/further-covid-19-restrictions-looming-coperni-fuels-paris-fashion-week-with-hope/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 5, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”04:59″,”amPm”:”am”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:1}},”id”:”16c41cdjapn000″},{“textContent”:”

BJ’s And Costco Show Strong Sales Leading Into 2021″,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”BJ’s And Costco Show Strong Sales Leading Into 2021″,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/shelleykohan/2021/03/04/bjs-and-costco-show-strong-sales—leading-into-2021/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 4, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”06:27″,”amPm”:”pm”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:2}},”id”:”4n9abdc6g9ac00″},{“textContent”:”

Macy’s, Shopify, Ralph Lauren And More Join Forces With Fashion Makes Change”,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”Macy’s, Shopify, Ralph Lauren And More Join Forces With Fashion Makes Change”,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/roxannerobinson/2021/03/04/macys-shopify-michael-kors-ralph-lauren-theory-and-more-join-forces-with-fashion-makes-change/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 4, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”10:39″,”amPm”:”am”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:3}},”id”:”4nd7a9rklba000″},{“textContent”:”

Bed Bath & Beyond Launches First Of Eight New Brands This Year”,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”Bed Bath & Beyond Launches First Of Eight New Brands This Year”,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/warrenshoulberg/2021/03/03/bed-bath–beyond-launches-first-of-eight-new-brands-this-year/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 3, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”12:22″,”amPm”:”pm”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:4}},”id”:”b4h614o1q04000″},{“textContent”:”

Walmart Gets Behind U.S. Manufacturing With 10-Year, $350 Billion Investment”,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”Walmart Gets Behind U.S. Manufacturing With 10-Year, $350 Billion Investment”,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/sharonedelson/2021/03/03/walmart-gets-behind-us-manufacturing-with-10-year-350-billion-investment/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 3, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”10:59″,”amPm”:”am”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:5}},”id”:”33rorm48fhj000″},{“textContent”:”

The Rewards Outweigh The Risks As Ralph Lauren Launches A Subscription Rental Program”,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”The Rewards Outweigh The Risks As Ralph Lauren Launches A Subscription Rental Program”,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2021/03/03/the-rewards-outweigh-the-risks-as-ralph-lauren-launches-a-subscription-rental-program/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 3, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”07:10″,”amPm”:”am”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:6}},”id”:”b3p9aacmr9og00″},{“textContent”:”

Kohl’s Reports Q4 2020 Above Expectations And Strong Outlook”,”scope”:{“topStory”:{“title”:”Kohl’s Reports Q4 2020 Above Expectations And Strong Outlook”,”uri”:”https://www.forbes.com/sites/walterloeb/2021/03/03/kohls-reports-q4-2020-above-expectations-and-strong-outlook/”,”date”:{“monthDayYear”:”Mar 3, 2021″,”hourMinute”:”07:10″,”amPm”:”am”,”isEDT”:false},”index”:7}},”id”:”cj5f448rr85800″}],”breakpoints”:[{“breakpoint”:”@media all and (max-width: 767px)”,”config”:{“enabled”:false}},{“breakpoint”:”@media all and (max-width: 768px)”,”config”:{“inView”:2,”slidesToScroll”:1}},{“breakpoint”:”@media all and (min-width: 1681px)”,”config”:{“inView”:6}}]};

View Source

They Were Journalists, and Women, and Targeted for Both

Though she noted that she was unaware of the station receiving any threats specific to the murdered women or female employees generally, “Being a journalist in Afghanistan is a risk. There’s no other way to put it,” she said. “Even just going to work or walking home from work, as we saw happen yesterday, can pose a risk.”

Since 2018, more than 30 media employees and journalists have been killed in Afghanistan, according to a recent United Nations report. It has been particularly bad for them, and for other civil society figures, during an increase in targeted killings documented by The New York Times since peace negotiations started in September 2020.

“I feel like we’re living in a horror movie these days,” said Rada Akbar, a Kabul-based photojournalist and artist. “So many people left the country. A lot of people got killed. And everyone else who is in the city is just …” she trailed off, then continued. “Everyone is so silent. It’s very scary.”

Mariam Alimi, a Kabul-based photojournalist, remembers the precise moment she heard that the three media workers in Jalalabad had been killed. “I was at my brother’s house,” she said. “I heard that three journalists had been killed, so I switched on the TV, and saw the story.”

The news, she said, was “a warning to me.” She travels throughout the country for her work, often alone. For years, she said, she felt safe enough doing so that she preferred to drive to assignments across the country rather than fly, which she considered a hassle. More recently, however, she has been threatened and followed by unknown men while on assignment. Her clients have canceled assignments and warned her not to travel.

And then came the killings on Tuesday, which felt like a message she couldn’t ignore.

The New York Times documented the deaths of at least 136 civilians and 168 security force members in such targeted killings and assassinations in 2020, more than nearly any other year of the war.

View Source

A Leading Critic of Big Tech Will Join the White House

His role, with a focus on competition policy, will be a new one in the National Economic Council. Mr. Wu will also focus on competition in labor policy, such as noncompete clauses enforced by companies, and concentration in power in agriculture and the drug industry. The job does not require Senate approval.

Mr. Biden has not yet named nominees to officially lead the Justice Department’s antitrust division and the Federal Trade Commission — the main agencies overseeing competition in commerce. Progressives have vociferously fought for the appointments of left-leaning advocates like Mr. Wu over individuals with histories of working for tech companies and law firms that represent them.

“Tim has been a longtime antitrust advocate, and he has pushed public officials to break up and rein in Big Tech,” Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, said in a statement. “I’m glad to see him in this role.”

Mr. Wu has left academia at various times to work in government. He was a special adviser to the Federal Trade Commission in 2011 and 2012 and then joined the National Economic Council to work on competition policy during the Obama administration, which was known for its kid-glove treatment of tech companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon. Mr. Wu has since expressed some regret.

“I worked in the Obama administra­tion, and I worked in antitrust, so I will take some personal blame here, but we have not provided the merger oversight we should have,” Mr. Wu said in an interview at the Aspen Ideas festival in 2019. He added that “maybe sometimes we had an overly rosy view” of the tech sector.

Relatively unbridled by regulations, those companies greatly expanded through mergers and acquisitions during President Barack Obama’s two terms. Mr. Wu has talked about the pivot of many Democrats since those days, with the realization that the tech giants have failed to live up to promises to protect user data, treat small competitors fairly and root out misinformation from their platforms.

Mr. Wu is best known for advocacy against powerful telecom companies and for coining the term “net neutrality,” the regulatory philosophy that consumers should get equal access to all content on the internet. More recently, he has turned his attention to the gatekeepers — like Facebook, Google and Amazon — that dominate speech, search and retail online.

View Source

Teen Vogue Selects Its Next Top Editor, the Political Reporter Alexi McCammond

Alexi McCammond, a political reporter at Axios, will be the next editor in chief of Teen Vogue, Condé Nast announced Friday.

Ms. McCammond, 27, made her name covering the 2018 midterm elections and Joseph R. Biden’s presidential campaign for Axios, a site known for its punchy Beltway coverage. She has also been a frequent contributor to NBC and MSNBC. In her new role, she will lead the Teen Vogue team across digital, video and social media. She starts on March 24.

The appointment of Ms. McCammond to the top Teen Vogue job suggests that the publication, which stopped publishing regular print issues in 2017, will continue to be a venue for political reporting and commentary, in addition to its coverage of fashion, beauty and culture. Teen Vogue expanded its purview during the political rise of Donald J. Trump, winning plaudits for essays like Lauren Duca’s “Donald Trump Is Gaslighting America” in 2016.

Ms. McCammond succeeds Lindsay Peoples Wagner, the editor in chief of Teen Vogue since 2018, who in January was appointed to the top job at New York Magazine’s style website, The Cut. Anna Wintour, the global editorial director of Vogue and Condé Nast’s chief content officer, said in a statement that Ms. McCammond had “the powerful curiosity and confidence that embodies the best of our next generation of leaders.”

Vanity Fair later reported, Mr. Ducklo tried to intimidate the Politico reporter writing the article, Tara Palmeri, telling her: “I will destroy you.”

Before the Politico item appeared, People published an exclusive, feel-good account of the relationship under the headline “Reporter Forgoes Covering President as Romance Blossoms with Biden Aide Battling Cancer: ‘Didn’t Think Twice.’”

After Mr. Ducklo’s treatment of the Politico reporter became public, the White House announced that it had suspended him. The next day, after many commentators noted President Biden’s earlier pledge to fire any staff member who behaved in a disrespectful manner, Mr. Ducklo resigned.

Ms. McCammond joined Axios in 2017 after a stint at the website Bustle. In 2019, the National Association of Black Journalists named her the emerging journalist of the year. She said in a statement that she looked forward to working with the Teen Vogue team to “build a unique community of ambitious, curious and fashion-forward young leaders.”

In January, Teen Vogue had 10.8 million unique viewers online, according to Condé Nast, a 21 percent jump over the previous year.

View Source

The cost of mining for cryptocash

Cryptocurrencies have been on a tear lately.

Bitcoin topped $58,000 in February for the first time. Ether, the world’s second-biggest cryptocurrency, has also hit record highs this year.

Even dogecoin — a cryptocurrency invented as a joke that does not have the same serious function and institutional backing as bitcoin — surged more than 50% in the last month after a tweet from Tesla CEO Elon Musk.

It is easier than ever to buy a small fraction of one bitcoin using an app such as Coinbase. However, that’s not the only way investors can get their hands on cryptocash.

Investors can also mine for the digital currency. CNBC went to a blockchain production studio in Brooklyn to learn how to mine for bitcoin’s biggest rival, ether, before the Covid-19 pandemic started.

Watch this video to learn how to mine for cryptocash and to find out how much it costs.

View Source

In Reconciliation Act, Macron Acknowledges Truth of Algerian Lawyer’s Death

PARIS — Emmanuel Macron, the first French president born after the brutal Algerian war of independence, has taken a further step toward reconciliation through truth by declaring that a leading Algerian lawyer and nationalist did not die by suicide in 1957, as France had long claimed, but was tortured and killed by French soldiers.

Ali Boumendjel, a prominent wartime defender of Algerians imprisoned by the French, was captured on Feb. 5, 1957, during the Battle of Algiers and held in secret for 43 days.

Speaking “in the name of France,” Mr. Macron said Mr. Boumendjel “did not commit suicide. He was tortured and then assassinated.”

For decades, and despite persistent pressure from the lawyer’s late widow, Malika Boumendjel, France clung to the story that the death was a suicide. It did so even after the French army general, Paul Aussaresses, admitted in a book published in 2001 that he had killed Mr. Boumendjel by defenestration through a sixth-floor window.

report commissioned by Mr. Macron on the legacy of colonization and a war for independence between the two countries. Written by Benjamin Stora, a prominent French historian, and made public in January, it called for a Memories and Truth Commission, now established, to shed light on the conflict’s grim history and to heal wounds.

the widespread use of torture by French forces, and specifically its use against Maurice Audin, a member of the Algerian Communist Party who was also killed by French soldiers in 1957.

Mr. Macron, who is facing a presidential election 14 months from now and knows how explosive the Algerian issue still is on the right of the political spectrum, has insisted that there will be “no repentance nor apologies.” The French ambassador to Algeria, François Gouyette, said in an interview published this week that reconciliation must be achieved through a spirit of “neither denial nor repentance.”

Jean Castex, Mr. Macron’s prime minister, said last November that French “self-flagellation” around the theme of colonization was regrettable. He called for the country to assume its history and find in it a source of pride.

The 60th anniversary of the end of the war will be marked in March next year, one month before the first round of the presidential election. Mr. Macron is determined to advance his quest for Franco-Algerian reconciliation before then, in part to head off the anti-immigrant challenge of Marine Le Pen.

A perennial candidate, Ms. Le Pen has been working hard to appeal to the moderate center-right by dropping some of her more extreme positions, like exiting the European Union and the euro. Her National Rally party, formerly the National Front, exploited resentments over the loss of Algeria to build its support after its founding almost a half-century ago.

“No crime, no atrocity committed by anyone during the Algerian War, can be excused or hidden,” Mr. Macron said in his statement. “They must be viewed with courage and lucidity, in the absolute respect of all those whose life and destiny they destroyed.”

View Source

Indonesia Says Schools Can’t Make Girls Wear Head Scarves

The father, a Christian, was upset that his 16-year-old daughter had been ordered to wear an Islamic head scarf at her public school in Indonesia. He met with the school’s vice principal and protested the rule. And he didn’t stop there: He streamed their conversation on Facebook Live.

“This is a requirement,” the vice principal, Zakri Zaini, sternly told the father, Elianu Hia, during their recorded conversation. “It has been stated in the school regulations.”

The video of the two men’s January conversation, which has been viewed more than 830,000 times, sparked a discussion across the majority-Muslim nation about religious discrimination, and it brought a swift declaration from the national government in support of religious freedom.

The government of President Joko Widodo last month issued a decree, which took effect on Friday, ordering public schools to respect religious freedom and prohibiting them from enforcing religious-based dress codes.

a conservative form of Islam, giving rise to greater intolerance of minority groups.

The government’s decree, which declares that public schools cannot “require, order, oblige, encourage or prohibit the use of uniforms with attributes of specific religions,” was lauded by civil rights groups. More significantly, it was held up by the minister of religious affairs as a reaffirmation of Indonesia’s status as a tolerant nation.

The minister, Yaqut Cholil Qoumas, called the head scarf case “the tip of the iceberg” and said the decree was intended, in part, to remind the public that Indonesia is a diverse nation built on pluralism.

“Indonesia is neither a religious state nor a secular state,” said Mr. Yaqut, a leading Muslim cleric and former member of Parliament. “It unites and harmonizes national values ​​and religious values.”

Brad Adams, the Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “The new decree is a long overdue step to end discriminatory dress codes.”

The decree applies to all of Indonesia’s 166,000 public schools except those in Aceh Province, which is semiautonomous and operates under a modified form of Islamic, or Shariah, law. Indonesia’s many religious schools are also exempt from the decree.

Jenni Hia, the Christian girl whose father challenged her school’s head scarf requirement, lives in Padang, the predominantly Muslim but not particularly conservative capital of West Sumatra.

The origin of Padang’s head scarf rule came to light when the former mayor, Fauzi Bahar, said he had implemented the policy in 2005. Many people protested at first, he said in an interview, but eventually they complied.

Non-Muslim students were not forced to wear a jilbab, but it was “recommended” because of its “many benefits,” he said. “If non-Muslim students do not wear the jilbab,” he said, “it will show them to be a minority.”

Mr. Hia, 56, an air-conditioning installer, has lived in Padang since 1986, and he and his family are part of a small Christian community.

“I live in harmony in my neighborhood,” he said. “I have good relations with my neighbors. They even support me on this issue and they are Muslim.”

After previously attending Christian schools, Mr. Hia’s daughter, Jenni, started attending classes at Padang Vocational Senior Secondary School 2, a public high school, in early January.

The school had not informed the family of the head scarf rule when she enrolled, Mr. Hia said, and she refused to wear one. She received five warnings before the school summoned Mr. Hia to meet with the vice principal.

Before the meeting, he searched for a provincial or education ministry rule requiring religious attire. He found none.

The situation was so “bizarre,” he said, that he decided to record the meeting and stream it live.

“This is the first time I encountered an incident like this,” he said. “I put it on live so there would be no accusation that I was making things up.”

During the meeting, Mr. Hia argued that it was a violation of his daughter’s rights, and of Indonesian law, for a public school to require her to wear the symbol of another religion.

For her to wear a head scarf, he said, was akin to lying about her religious identity.

“Where are my religious rights?” he asked. “Where are my human rights? This is a public school.”

But Mr. Zakri argued that the requirement was in the rule book. “It becomes awkward for the teachers when there are children who do not follow the rules,” he said.

After the meeting, father and daughter signed a statement that she was not willing to wear a head scarf as dictated by school regulations, and that they would await a decision from “a more authoritative official.”

Two days later, after the video went viral, the school’s principal, Rusmadi, who like many Indonesians uses only one name, offered a public apology for the way the dress code had been applied. He acknowledged that 23 non-Muslim students had been inappropriately required to wear jilbabs.

“I apologize for any mistakes of the staff,” he said. “It is obligatory to obey the rules. It is not obligatory for non-Muslims to wear Muslim clothes.”

He added, “I guarantee that Jenni can still go to school as usual.”

View Source