Islamic State affiliate in Afghanistan was militarily defeated their eastern stronghold in late 2019. But smaller and more amorphous elements continue to operate with low intensity in the region, including in Kabul, waiting to take advantage of whatever might happen in the coming months.

U.S. military and intelligence officials have suggested a limited timeline — a handful years at best.

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Biden to Withdraw Combat Troops From Afghanistan by Sept. 11

But Mr. Biden’s decision drew fire from Republicans.

“This is a reckless and dangerous decision,” said Senator James M. Inhofe of Oklahoma, the ranking Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee. “Arbitrary deadlines would likely put our troops in danger, jeopardize all the progress we’ve made, and lead to civil war in Afghanistan — and create a breeding ground for international terrorists.”

President Donald J. Trump had set a withdrawal deadline for May 1, but he was known for announcing, and reversing, a number of significant foreign policy decisions, and Pentagon officials continued to press for a delay. Mr. Biden, who has long been skeptical of the Afghan deployment, spent his first three months in office assessing that timeline.

The Afghan central government is unable to halt Taliban advances, and American officials offer a grim assessment of prospects for peace in the country. Still, American intelligence agencies say they do not believe Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups pose an immediate threat to strike the United States from Afghanistan. That assessment has been critical to the Biden administration as it decided to withdraw most of the remaining forces from the country.

A senior administration official said the troop withdrawal would begin before May 1 and conclude before the symbolic date of Sept. 11. Any attacks on withdrawing NATO troops, the official said, would be met with a forceful response.

Taliban leaders have long pledged that any breach of the deadline means that their forces will again begin attacking American and coalition troops. Under a withdrawal deal negotiated during the Trump administration, the Taliban mostly stopped those attacks — but in past weeks, they have rocketed American bases in Afghanistan’s south and east.

In public statements on Tuesday, Taliban leaders focused not on Mr. Biden’s decision for a full withdrawal — leaving behind a weak central government that has proved incapable of halting insurgent advances around the country — but rather on the fact that the administration was going to miss the May 1 deadline.

“We are not agreeing with delay after May 1,” Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman, said on local television. “Any delay after May 1 is not acceptable for us.”

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Biden to Withdraw All Combat Troops From Afghanistan by Sept. 11

But Mr. Biden’s decision drew fire from Republicans.

“This is a reckless and dangerous decision,” said Senator James M. Inhofe of Oklahoma, the ranking Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee. “Arbitrary deadlines would likely put our troops in danger, jeopardize all the progress we’ve made, and lead to civil war in Afghanistan — and create a breeding ground for international terrorists.”

President Donald J. Trump had set a withdrawal deadline for May 1, but he was known for announcing, and reversing, a number of significant foreign policy decisions, and Pentagon officials continued to press for a delay. Mr. Biden, who has long been skeptical of the Afghan deployment, spent his first three months in office assessing that timeline.

The Afghan central government is unable to halt Taliban advances, and American officials offer a grim assessment of prospects for peace in the country. Still, American intelligence agencies say they do not believe Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups pose an immediate threat to strike the United States from Afghanistan. That assessment has been critical to the Biden administration as it decided to withdraw most of the remaining forces from the country.

A senior administration official said the troop withdrawal would begin before May 1 and conclude before the symbolic date of Sept. 11. Any attacks on withdrawing NATO troops, the official said, would be met with a forceful response.

Taliban leaders have long pledged that any breach of the deadline means that their forces will again begin attacking American and coalition troops. Under a withdrawal deal negotiated during the Trump administration, the Taliban mostly stopped those attacks — but in past weeks, they have rocketed American bases in Afghanistan’s south and east.

In public statements on Tuesday, Taliban leaders focused not on Mr. Biden’s decision for a full withdrawal — leaving behind a weak central government that has proved incapable of halting insurgent advances around the country — but rather on the fact that the administration was going to miss the May 1 deadline.

“We are not agreeing with delay after May 1,” Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman, said on local television. “Any delay after May 1 is not acceptable for us.”

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Afghan War Casualty Report: April 2021

The following report compiles all significant security incidents confirmed by New York Times reporters throughout Afghanistan for the month. It is necessarily incomplete as many local officials refuse to confirm casualty information. The report includes government claims of insurgent casualty figures, but in most cases these cannot be independently verified by The Times. Similarly, the reports do not include Taliban claims for their attacks on the government unless they can be verified. Both sides routinely inflate casualty totals for their opponents.

At least 64 pro-government forces and 17 civilians were killed in Afghanistan the past week. The deadliest attack took place in Helmand Province, where the Taliban attacked a military base called Waziromanda near Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital, killing 10 soldiers and taking 12 others prisoner. Insurgents captured the base and seized all weapons and equipment. In another incident in Helmand, a car bomb targeted a police outpost in Nawa District, killing eight soldiers and wounding 12 others. In Baghlan Province, a military convoy was attacked by the Taliban in the Hajda Kotal area of Dahana-e-Ghori District, killing five soldiers and wounding four others.

[Read the Afghan War Casualty Report from previous weeks.]

April 8 Herat Province: one civilian killed

One civilian was killed and another was wounded in an attack by unknown gunmen in the Second Police District of Herat city, the provincial capital.

April 7 Herat Province: one police officer killed

A police officer was shot and killed by unknown gunmen in the center of Karokh District.

April 7 Baghlan Province: four police officers killed

The Taliban attacked a security outpost in Pul-i-Khumri city, the provincial capital, killing four police officers and wounding three others.

April 7 Badghis Province: one police officer killed

The Taliban shot and killed a police officer in the village of Pir-e-Ghaibi of Qadis District.

April 7 Herat Province: three security forces killed

Three members of a pro-government militia were killed and another went missing after a Taliban attack on a security outpost in the center of Pashtun Zarghun District. An additional five militia members were taken prisoner by insurgents.

April 7 Baghlan Province: five soldiers killed

The Taliban attacked a military convoy in the Hajda Kotal area of Dahan-e-Ghori District, killing five soldiers and wounding four others.

April 7 Baghlan Province: one police officer killed

The Taliban attacked a military base in Eshkamish District, killing one police officer and wounding four others.

April 7 Takhar Province: five police officers killed

Five police officers, including a company commander, were killed and eight others were wounded during a Taliban attack in the Khwaja Band Kashan village in Ishkamish District.

April 7 Kabul Province: one civilian killed

The head of the service department in the National Statistics and Information Authority was shot and killed by unknown gunmen in Qala-e-Wazir area of Paghman District. Police have launched an investigation.

April 7 Nangarhar Province: two civilians killed

A roadside bomb exploded near a police vehicle in the Second Police District of Jalalabad, the provincial capital, killing two civilians and wounding three police officers and 15 civilians.

April 6 Kunduz Province: four police officers killed

Four police officers were killed and three others were taken prisoner in a Taliban attack in the Fifth Police District of Kunduz city, the provincial capital.

April 6 Kunduz Province: one commando killed

One Afghan commando was killed and three others were wounded in the Ostaming village of Imam Sahib District during a military operation.

April 6 Badghis Province: one civilian killed

The Taliban shot and killed a former police officer in the village of Kanaqol in Aab Kamari District.

April 6 Badghis Province: one soldier killed

One soldier was shot and killed by the Taliban in the village of Shotor Gardan in Qala-e-Naw, the provincial capital.

April 6 Kabul Province: one police officer killed

Unknown gunmen shot and killed a police officer in Baghlan District. The attackers managed to escape from the area.

April 6 Kandahar Province: one civilian killed

A motorcycle was hit by a roadside bomb in the center of Panjwai District, killing one civilian.

April 6 Kandahar Province: four civilians killed

A passenger bus was hit by a roadside bomb in Maiwand District, on the highway connecting Kandahar to Kabul, killing four civilians and wounding 13 others.

April 6 Nangarhar Province: four police officers killed

The Taliban attacked a security outpost in Ghazi Baba area of Surkh Rod District, killing four police officers and seizing their weapons. Local authorities claimed that nine Taliban fighters were also killed in the clashes.

April 5 Ghor Province: one soldier killed

The Taliban attacked a military convoy in the village of Kharistan in Firoz Koh, the provincial capital. One soldier was killed in the clashes. Local authorities claimed that two Taliban fighters were also killed.

April 5 Helmand Province: 10 soldiers killed

The Taliban attacked a military base called Waziromanda near Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital, killing 10 soldiers and taking 12 others prisoner. Insurgents captured the base and seized all weapons and equipment.

April 5 Helmand Province: eight police officers killed

A car bomb targeted a police outpost in Nawa District, killing eight soldiers and wounding 12 others.

April 5 Herat Province: four soldiers killed

The Taliban attacked a security outpost in the village of Jou-e-Qazi of Shindand District, where fighting continued for several hours. Four soldiers were killed and three others were wounded in the battle. An additional six soldiers were taken prisoner by the Taliban.

April 5 Kabul Province: one security force killed

A military truck was hit by a roadside bomb in Sabz Sang area of Qarabagh District, killing one member of the territorial army and wounding four others.

April 4 Kabul Province: three security forces killed

The Taliban targeted a military convoy with a car bomb in Panja Chenar area of Paghman District, killing three security force members and wounding 12 others.

April 4 Herat Province: one police officer killed

The Taliban attacked a security outpost in the village of Rood-e-Gaz in Adraskan District, killing one police officer and taking three others prisoner.

April 4 Kabul Province: one soldier killed

An army truck was hit by a roadside bomb in Qargha area of Paghman District, killing one soldier and wounding three others.

April 3 Takhar Province: one civilian killed

Unknown gunmen shot and killed the son of Juma Khan, a member of the provincial council in the Pole-e-shahrawan area of Taloqan, the provincial capital. The attacker was able to flee from the area.

April 3 Kunar Province: four soldiers killed

The Taliban attacked two security outposts in the Gulsalk area of Chapa Dara District, killing four soldiers and taking four others prisoner. Two soldiers are missing. The Taliban captured one of the security outposts and burned it down. A Humvee was also blown up by a bomb.

April 2 Helmand Province: six civilians killed

A vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb in Sarkar area of Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital, killing six civilians.


Reporting was contributed by Najim Rahim and Fatima Faizi from Kabul, Zabihullah Ghazi from Jalalabad, Farooq Jan Mangal from Khost, Taimoor Shah from Kandahar and Asadullah Timoory from Herat.

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U.S. Looks to Build on Secret Portions of Taliban Deal to Reduce Violence

DOHA, Qatar — U.S. diplomats are trying to build on parts of the peace deal made with the Taliban last year, specifically the classified portions that outlined what military actions — on both sides — were supposed to be prohibited under the signed agreement, according to American, Afghan and Taliban officials.

The negotiations, which have been quietly underway for months, have morphed into the Biden administration’s last-ditch diplomatic effort to achieve a reduction in violence, which could enable the United States to still exit the country should broader peace talks fail to yield progress in the coming weeks.

If these discussions, and the separate talks between the Afghan government and Taliban falter, the United States will likely find itself with thousands of troops in Afghanistan beyond May 1. That’s the deadline by which all American military forces are meant to withdraw from the country under the 2020 agreement with the Taliban and would come at a time when the insurgent group likely will have begun its spring offensive against the beleaguered Afghan security forces.

Both of these conditions would almost certainly set back any progress made in the past months toward a political settlement, despite both the Trump and the Biden administrations’ fervent attempts to end the United States’ longest-running war.

two annexes of the 2020 deal, which were deemed classified by the Trump administration, is intended to stave off an insurgent victory on the battlefield during the peace talks by limiting Taliban military operations against Afghan forces, according to U.S. officials and others familiar with the negotiations. In return, the United States would push for the release of all Taliban prisoners still imprisoned by the Afghan government and the lifting of United Nations sanctions against the Taliban — two goals outlined in the original deal.

These new negotiations, which exclude representatives from the Afghan government, are being carried out amid a contentious logjam between the Taliban and the Afghans, despite pressure from international and regional actors on both sides to commit to some form of a path forward.

first reported by Tolo News, with requests that were not fully accepted by the U.S. negotiators and included severe restrictions on U.S. air power.

Many of the delays in securing a new deal to reduce violence stem from the original February 2020 agreement.

That deal loosely called for the Taliban to stop suicide attacks and large-scale offensives in exchange for the Americans forces scaling back drone strikes and raids, among other types of military assaults. But both sides interpreted those terms differently, officials said, and both have accused one another of violating the deal. The Taliban is also supposed to cut ties with Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups, but the U.S. intelligence community has seen little movement toward that goal.

Under the current arrangement, U.S. forces can defend their Afghan allies if they are being attacked, but the Taliban said U.S. airstrikes have been carried out against their fighters who were not attacking Afghan forces.

Digital spreadsheets maintained by the Taliban and viewed by The Times detail hundreds of purported U.S. violations. They record in detail the group’s wounded and killed, along with civilian casualties and property damage. However, the Taliban often do not distinguish between offensive operations carried out by Afghan security forces from those by U.S. forces, and several of the events The Times was able to independently verify from June 2020 did not involve American troops.

The new terms for a reduction in violence have been a serious point of contention during the past several months, during meetings frequently held at the Sharq Village and Spa, a luxurious resort in Doha, Qatar.

Meetings between American officials and the Taliban in Doha — including with high-level officials like then Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in November and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark A. Milley, in December — attempted to scale back Taliban attacks and stop the bloody assassination campaign wreaking havoc across the country, but made little headway.

With time running out, the Biden administration is hoping for more success, though these discussions continue to hit roadblocks.

Negotiations between the Afghans and the Taliban, which began in September, have practically come to a halt as the insurgent group has remained reluctant to discuss any future government or power-sharing deal while the United States remains noncommittal about whether it will withdraw from Afghanistan by May 1.

The Biden administration’s recent push for talks in Turkey could be promising, officials and experts said, but the Taliban have yet to agree to attend.

The insurgent group thinks Mr. Biden’s negotiators are manipulating the proposed agreement to reduce violence by asking for “extreme” measures, such as halting the use of roadside bombs and pausing attacks on checkpoints, according to people close to the negotiations.

Taliban negotiators say they believe the American requests equate to a cease-fire, while U.S. military officials say that if certain parameters are not clearly outlined, then the Taliban will shift their tactics to exploit any loopholes they can find — like they have done in the past.

Some of the more striking episodes happened in the past week when C.I.A.-backed militia forces were accused of killing more than a dozen civilians in a Taliban-controlled village in Khost Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

In retaliation, the Taliban authorized their fighters to attack the American military and C.I.A. base there and publicly took responsibility for the rocket attack that followed: a first for the insurgent group since it has mostly stopped, or refused to acknowledge, attacks against U.S. bases and troops, per the terms of the 2020 deal.

Some Taliban officials believe the C.I.A.-backed forces should be disbanded and their operations stopped if the insurgent group agrees to any further reduction in violence, according to people close to the negotiations, but it is unclear if the insurgent group has raised those concerns directly. Regardless, any such request is likely to fall on deaf ears as the U.S. military and intelligence community views these forces as some of the Afghans’ most effective, despite the litany of human rights abuses leveled against them.

The Khost incident highlights the difficulty of reaching an understanding when it comes to decreasing the intensity of the war, and the need for an international third-party monitoring body, such as the United Nations, in any future cease-fires or agreements to reduce violence, experts said.

It is unlikely the United States and Taliban will reach a new deal before May 1, analysts say, unless U.S. officials are willing to make serious concessions to prevent a violent offensive this spring, one that seems to already have started given the series of large attacks and assassinations by the Taliban in recent days.

Some experts have criticized the United States’ narrow focus on a short-term reduction of violence as a distraction from the larger effort of reaching a political settlement between the Afghan government and the Taliban.

“I am hard pressed to see what payoff there’s been for the amount of effort that has been put into trying to get limited violence reduction front-loaded in the peace process,” said Laurel E. Miller, a former top State Department official who worked on Afghanistan and Pakistan diplomacy under the previous two administrations. “It might be helpful for political optics in covering for an American withdrawal. But what’s going to make this stick afterward if there isn’t a real settlement? Nothing.”

Farooq Jan Mangal contributed reporting from Khost Province.

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The Taliban Think They Have Already Won, Peace Deal or Not

KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban’s swagger is unmistakable. From the recent bellicose speech of their deputy leader, boasting of “conquests,” to sneering references to the “foreign masters” of the “illegitimate” Kabul government, to the Taliban’s own website tally of “puppets” killed — Afghan soldiers — they are promoting a bold message:

We have already won the war.

And that belief, grounded in military and political reality, is shaping Afghanistan’s volatile present. On the eve of talks in Turkey next month over the country’s future, it is the elephant in the room: the half-acknowledged truth that the Taliban have the upper hand and are thus showing little outward interest in compromise, or of going along with the dominant American idea, power-sharing.

While the Taliban’s current rhetoric is also propaganda, the grim sense of Taliban supremacy is dictating the response of a desperate Afghan government and influencing Afghanistan’s anxious foreign interlocutors. It contributes to the abandonment of dozens of checkpoints and falling morale among the Afghan security forces, already hammered by a “not sustainable” casualty rate of perhaps 3,000 a month, a senior Western diplomat in Kabul said.

The group doesn’t hide its pride at having compelled its principal adversary for 20 years, the United States to negotiate with the Taliban and, last year, to sign an agreement to completely withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan by May 1, 2021. In exchange, the Taliban agreed to stop attacking foreign forces and to sever ties with international terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda.

Zalmay Khalilzad, the American peace envoy — would merely be used by the Taliban as a “Trojan horse” for the seizure of power.

recent paper — though, he notes, this may be driven more by political imperative than a softening of ideology.

Elsewhere, the Taliban’s increasingly confident messaging has penetrated deep into its rank-and-file, in large part because events have borne it out.

People said that it is not possible to fire on U.S. forces,” said Muslim Mohabat, a former Taliban fighter from Watapor District in Kunar Province. “They would say the barrel of the rifle would bend if you open fire on them, but we attacked them, and nothing happened.”

“Then we kept attacking them and forced them to leave the valley,” said Mr. Mohabat, who fought in some of the most violent battles of the war with the United States.

In the insurgents’ view, their advances will inexorably lead to the end of the Kabul government.

“On the battlefield there is a sense that, ‘We’re stronger than ever,’’’ said Ashley Jackson, a Taliban expert at the Overseas Development Institute. “Power-sharing and democracy, these are anathema to their political culture.”

Fahim Abed, Fatima Faizi and Thomas Gibbons-Neff contributed reporting.

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Foes in Afghan War See a Common Threat of Islamic State’s Return

THE PECH VALLEY, Afghanistan — A valley of wood workshops and green wheat fields, torn apart by violence during two decades of war in eastern Afghanistan, is now strangely quiet — the result of an uneasy truce between the Taliban and the local Afghan government, forged by a mutual enemy.

The two sides worked practically side by side to oust the Islamic State from Kunar Province’s Pech Valley — a strip of mountains and earth that saw fierce fighting at the height of the American-led war. The Islamic State had taken root there before Afghanistan’s president, Ashraf Ghani, claimed it was “obliterated” in late 2019.

Now the Islamic State attacks are rare and come only at night, residents say, by fighters from areas outside of Taliban and government control. Yet while smaller and more amorphous after its military defeat, the terror group still poses a threat to the region as it recruits both in cities and the countryside, waiting to take advantage of whatever might follow in the war’s next iteration.

The coming months could signal a shift in the group’s prominence, should the Taliban agree to stop fighting the Afghan government on a national scale and disenfranchised fighters — who have spent much of their lives at war — seek a new group with whom to ally in return for a steady paycheck.

The Hardest Place,” a recently published book on the region by Wesley Morgan, a journalist. By early last year, much of the Islamic State was wiped out.

recent report from the Afghan Analysts Network — that offered residents of the Pech a precarious return to normalcy.

Some Islamic State fighters who weren’t imprisoned instead reached out to the government and committed to lay down their arms. In return, they were promised a monthly stipend of around $100 and handed a signed letter from the National Directorate of Security, Afghanistan’s intelligence agency, noting they had “joined the peace process.”

But residents in the valley are concerned that the ongoing peace talks in Doha, Qatar between the government and the Taliban may upend the current equilibrium.

gunned down in Jalalabad. The Islamic State claimed responsibility.

Mr. Ali fled the city, as did dozens of other factory workers. Local government officials closed some factories, leaving the building where the seven Hazaras were killed nearly untouched since the attack.

The dead employees’ shoes had been left behind. Blood stains — despite a recent gust of rain — remained soaked into the churned white rock.

Fahim Abed contributed reporting.

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At Least 9 Dead in Afghan Helicopter Crash, After Clashes With Local Militia

KABUL, Afghanistan — Nine security personnel were killed after an Afghan military helicopter was downed, likely by militia forces, in eastern Afghanistan early Thursday, signaling a drastic rift between the Afghan government and the regional forces supposedly under its control.

The fighting occurred in Wardak, a mountainous province that borders Kabul in the country’s east. There, militia forces led by Abdul Ghani Alipur, a local warlord with a spotty rights record, have been engaged in a tense, sometimes violent, standoff with government troops since January.

The latest clashes have pushed the uneasy relationship to its breaking point as the country moves toward an uncertain future.

“There was fighting, helicopters were targeting us, and when the helicopter was firing rockets, we had to shoot at it,” Mohammad Hussain Tawana, an aide for Mr. Alipur, said of the attack that occurred in Hisa-e-Awal Behsud district. He added that it wasn’t clear whether the crash was caused by the shooting or by technical problems.

Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, and more than 30 were wounded.

The Afghan government suspended Allah Dad Fedayi, the provincial police chief of Wardak, for overseeing the forces that attacked the demonstrators. But Mr. Tawana, the aide, still cited him as a reason for the fighting that reignited late Wednesday night, as the police chief was simply reassigned to another province earlier this week.

“The people understand that there would be no action taken by the government because of the incident, so they finally decided to take action themselves,” Mr. Tawana said.

interview with ABC News that aired Wednesday, President Biden said it would be “tough” to meet the deadline, publicly hinting at a prolonged troop presence in the country that could scuttle last year’s U.S.-Taliban deal as the insurgent group has strictly opposed any such extension.

Mr. Biden added that he was consulting with allies on the drawdown, and said that if the deadline were to be extended, it would not be by “a lot longer.”

Fatima Faizi and Fahim Abed contributed reporting.

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Afghan War Casualty Report: March 2021

The following report compiles all significant security incidents confirmed by New York Times reporters throughout Afghanistan from the past seven days. It is necessarily incomplete as many local officials refuse to confirm casualty information. The report includes government claims of insurgent casualty figures, but in most cases these cannot be independently verified by The Times. Similarly, the reports do not include Taliban claims for their attacks on the government unless they can be verified. Both sides routinely inflate casualty totals for their opponents.

At least 21 pro-government forces and 22 civilians were killed in Afghanistan the past week. The deadliest attack took place in Kunduz Province, where the Taliban attacked a security outpost in the Telawka area of the Sixth Police District in Kunduz city, the provincial capital, killing eight soldiers and wounding four others. The Taliban captured the outpost and seized weapons and equipment, including two Humvees. In Nangarhar Province, unknown gunmen entered a plaster factory in the Mar Ghondi area of Surkh Rod District, killing seven workers who were Hazara. The gunmen first tied the hands and legs of all seven civilians and then shot them with a suppressed pistol. Local officials in Nangarhar believed that the attack was carried out by the Islamic State affiliated group. In another attack in the province, three women who worked at a local television network were shot and killed in two different attacks in the First Police District of Jalalabad city, the provincial capital. All three women were working in the dubbing section of the television network. Another woman was also wounded in the attack.

[Read the Afghan War Casualty Report from previous months.]

March 4 Badghis Province: four security forces killed

Four pro-government militia members were killed in a Taliban ambush in the village of Band-e-Qashqah in Ab-Kamari District. The militia members were on patrol when they came under attack.

March 4 Nangarhar Province: one female doctor killed

A sticky bomb attached to a rickshaw exploded in the Third Police District of Jalalabad, the provincial capital, killing a female doctor and wounding a child.

March 3 Kunduz Province: eight soldiers killed

The Taliban attacked a security outpost in the Telawka area of the Sixth Police District in Kunduz city, the provincial capital, killing eight soldiers and wounding four others. The Taliban captured the outpost and seized weapons and equipment, including two Humvees.

March 3 Nangarhar Province: seven civilians killed

Unknown gunmen entered a plaster factory in the Mar Ghondi area of Surkh Rod District, killing seven Hazara workers. The gunmen first tied the hands and legs of all seven civilians and then shot them with a suppressed pistol. Local officials in Nangarhar believed that the attack was carried out by the Islamic State affiliated group.

March 3 Khost Province: two civilians killed

The Taliban attacked a truck in Sabari District that belonged to a company providing food for Afghan forces in Zazai Maidan District, killing two civilians and taking another prisoner.

March 3 Helmand Province: one police officer killed

A sticky bomb attached to a police vehicle went off in the Third Police District of Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital, killing one police officer and wounding one civilian.

March 3 Kabul Province: one civilian killed

Faiz Mohammad Fayez, a religious scholar was shot and killed by unknown gunmen while he was on his way to mosque for morning prayer in the 17th Police District of Kabul city, the capital. Mr. Fayez was head of the provincial scholars council in Kunduz Province, but due to security threats there, he moved to Kabul and was teaching in a madrasa.

March 2 Jowzjan Province: one security force member killed

A military vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb in the eastern part of Sheberghan, the provincial capital. One member of the public protection forces was killed and six others were wounded.

March 2 Nangarhar Province: three journalists killed

Three women employees of a local television network were shot and killed in two different attacks in the First Police District of Jalalabad. All three women were working in the dubbing section of the television network. Another woman was also wounded in the attack.

March 1 Jowzjan Province: one civilian killed

A bomb attached to a private vehicle exploded in the First Police District of Sheberghan, the provincial capital, killing a tribal elder and wounding three civilians.

Feb. 28 Kunduz Province: one police officer killed

The Taliban abducted and killed a counternarcotics police officer in the Third Police District of Kunduz city. The officer was aware of the Taliban’s arrival and he tried to escape.

Feb. 28 Badghis Province: two police officers killed

Two police officers were shot and killed by the Taliban in the village of Laman in Qala-e-Naw, the provincial capital. Both officers were traveling by public transport when they were abducted by the Taliban.

Feb. 28 Ghazni Province: one civilian killed

A roadside bomb explosion killed one civilian and wounded five civilians and two security forces in Qalay-e-Sabz area of Ghazni city, the provincial capital.

Feb. 27 Badghis Province: four civilians killed

One woman and three children were killed and five others were wounded when a mortar fired by the Afghan army hit a house in the village of Langar in Qadis District. The mortar shell was fired after a military convoy came under the Taliban ambush in the area.

Feb. 27 Kabul Province: one civilian killed

One civilian was killed and two others were wounded when a roadside bomb hit a civilian vehicle in Bagrami District.

Feb. 26 Kandahar Province: four police officers killed

The Taliban loaded a stolen Humvee with explosives targeted a highway police battalion in the Faqiran village of Arghandab District, killing four police officers and wounding six others.

Feb. 26 Nangarhar Province: one civilian killed

A sticky bomb attached to a rickshaw exploded in the Ninth Police District of Jalalabad, killing one civilian.


Reporting was contributed by Najim Rahim from Kabul, Asadullah Timory from Herat, Zabihullah Ghazi from Nangarhar, Farooq Jan Mangal from Khost and Taimoor Shah from Kandahar.

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