Alexi McCammond, Teen Vogue Editor, Resigns

“Our teams, our families and our friends have all been affected by the rise in hate crimes toward Asian people and it’s unacceptable,” Mr. Lynch wrote in the memo, which was reviewed by The Times.

Ms. McCammond had been vetted before Condé Nast hired her, and top executives including Mr. Lynch and Anna Wintour, the chief content officer and the global editorial director of Vogue, were aware of the decade-old racist tweets, Mr. Duncan said in his note on Thursday, and Ms. McCammond acknowledged them in interviews with the company.

Ms. Wintour discussed the tweets with leaders of color at Condé Nast before the job was offered, according to a company executive who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a personnel issue. Ms. McCammond struck Condé Nast leaders as an impressive candidate, the executive said, and they felt her 2019 apology showed that she had learned from her mistakes.

Although the company was aware of the racist tweets, it did not know about the homophobic tweets or a photo, also from 2011, that was recently published by a right-wing website showing her in Native American costume at a Halloween party, the executive said. The vetting process did not turn up the additional material because it had been deleted, the executive added.

Condé Nast has reckoned with complaints of racism in its workplace and content over the past year. In June, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, Ms. Wintour sent a note to the Vogue staff, writing that, under her leadership, the magazine had not given enough space to “Black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creators” and acknowledging that it had published “images or stories that have been hurtful or intolerant.”

Adam Rapoport, the editor in chief of another Condé Nast publication, Bon Appétit, resigned in June after a photo of him resurfaced on social media, drawing condemnations from the staff for an offensive depiction of Puerto Ricans.

In the last two weeks, as complaints mounted, Ms. Wintour tried to build support for the would-be Teen Vogue editor. Ms. McCammond also participated in meetings with Condé Nast staff members and other groups to apologize further and listen to their concerns, including one-on-one talks with journalists at Teen Vogue, according to six people with knowledge of the meetings.

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Teen Vogue Staff Members Condemn Editor’s Decade-Old, Racist Tweets

A group of Teen Vogue staff members raised concerns on Monday over decade-old racist tweets by their new editor in chief, Alexi McCammond.

Ms. McCammond, 27, a political reporter for Axios and a contributor for MSNBC and NBC, was named the top editor of the Condé Nast publication on Friday. Over the weekend, offensive tweets she had sent as a teenager in 2011 were recirculated on social media.

The tweets were originally uncovered in 2019, and Ms. McCammond apologized for them at the time, saying: “I am deeply sorry to anyone I offended. I have since deleted those tweets as they do not reflect my views or who I am today.”

In a note posted to Twitter on Monday night, a group of more than 20 Teen Vogue staff members said they had written a letter to Condé Nast management condemning Ms. McCammond’s “past racist and homophobic tweets.”

Mr. Ducklo resigned from the White House in February after threatening a Politico reporter who was working on a story about the relationship.

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Teen Vogue Selects Its Next Top Editor, the Political Reporter Alexi McCammond

Alexi McCammond, a political reporter at Axios, will be the next editor in chief of Teen Vogue, Condé Nast announced Friday.

Ms. McCammond, 27, made her name covering the 2018 midterm elections and Joseph R. Biden’s presidential campaign for Axios, a site known for its punchy Beltway coverage. She has also been a frequent contributor to NBC and MSNBC. In her new role, she will lead the Teen Vogue team across digital, video and social media. She starts on March 24.

The appointment of Ms. McCammond to the top Teen Vogue job suggests that the publication, which stopped publishing regular print issues in 2017, will continue to be a venue for political reporting and commentary, in addition to its coverage of fashion, beauty and culture. Teen Vogue expanded its purview during the political rise of Donald J. Trump, winning plaudits for essays like Lauren Duca’s “Donald Trump Is Gaslighting America” in 2016.

Ms. McCammond succeeds Lindsay Peoples Wagner, the editor in chief of Teen Vogue since 2018, who in January was appointed to the top job at New York Magazine’s style website, The Cut. Anna Wintour, the global editorial director of Vogue and Condé Nast’s chief content officer, said in a statement that Ms. McCammond had “the powerful curiosity and confidence that embodies the best of our next generation of leaders.”

Vanity Fair later reported, Mr. Ducklo tried to intimidate the Politico reporter writing the article, Tara Palmeri, telling her: “I will destroy you.”

Before the Politico item appeared, People published an exclusive, feel-good account of the relationship under the headline “Reporter Forgoes Covering President as Romance Blossoms with Biden Aide Battling Cancer: ‘Didn’t Think Twice.’”

After Mr. Ducklo’s treatment of the Politico reporter became public, the White House announced that it had suspended him. The next day, after many commentators noted President Biden’s earlier pledge to fire any staff member who behaved in a disrespectful manner, Mr. Ducklo resigned.

Ms. McCammond joined Axios in 2017 after a stint at the website Bustle. In 2019, the National Association of Black Journalists named her the emerging journalist of the year. She said in a statement that she looked forward to working with the Teen Vogue team to “build a unique community of ambitious, curious and fashion-forward young leaders.”

In January, Teen Vogue had 10.8 million unique viewers online, according to Condé Nast, a 21 percent jump over the previous year.

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