Ten states, however, have adopted their own laws that specify which patients, based on their income and family size, qualify for free or discounted care. Among them is Washington, where Providence is based. All hospitals in the state must provide free care for anyone who makes under 300 percent of the federal poverty level. For a family of four, that threshold is $83,250 a year.

In February, Bob Ferguson, the state’s attorney general, accused Providence of violating state law, in part by using debt collectors to pursue more than 55,000 patient accounts. The suit alleged that Providence wrongly claimed those patients owed a total of more than $73 million.

Providence, which is fighting the lawsuit, has said it will stop using debt collectors to pursue money from low-income patients who should qualify for free care in Washington.

But The Times found that the problems extend beyond Washington. In interviews, patients in California and Oregon who qualified for free care said they had been charged thousands of dollars and then harassed by collection agents. Many saw their credit scores ruined. Others had to cut back on groceries to pay what Providence claimed they owed. In both states, nonprofit hospitals are required by law to provide low-income patients with free or discounted care.

“I felt a little betrayed,” said Bev Kolpin, 57, who had worked as a sonogram technician at a Providence hospital in Oregon. Then she went on unpaid leave to have surgery to remove a cyst. The hospital billed her $8,000 even though she was eligible for discounted care, she said. “I had worked for them and given them so much, and they didn’t give me anything.” (The hospital forgave her debt only after a lawyer contacted Providence on Ms. Kolpin’s behalf.)

was a single room with four beds. The hospital charged patients $1 a day, not including extras like whiskey.

Patients rarely paid in cash, sometimes offering chickens, ducks and blankets in exchange for care.

At the time, hospitals in the United States were set up to do what Providence did — provide inexpensive care to the poor. Wealthier people usually hired doctors to treat them at home.

wrote to the Senate in 2005.

Some hospital executives have embraced the comparison to for-profit companies. Dr. Rod Hochman, Providence’s chief executive, told an industry publication in 2021 that “‘nonprofit health care’ is a misnomer.”

“It is tax-exempt health care,” he said. “It still makes profits.”

Those profits, he added, support the hospital’s mission. “Every dollar we make is going to go right back into Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, Alaska and Montana.”

Since Dr. Hochman took over in 2013, Providence has become a financial powerhouse. Last year, it earned $1.2 billion in profits through investments. (So far this year, Providence has lost money.)

Providence also owes some of its wealth to its nonprofit status. In 2019, the latest year available, Providence received roughly $1.2 billion in federal, state and local tax breaks, according to the Lown Institute, a think tank that studies health care.

a speech by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: “If it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.”

Ms. Tizon, the spokeswoman for Providence, said the intent of Rev-Up was “not to target or pressure those in financial distress.” Instead, she said, “it aimed to provide patients with greater pricing transparency.”

“We recognize the tone of the training materials developed by McKinsey was not consistent with our values,” she said, adding that Providence modified the materials “to ensure we are communicating with each patient with compassion and respect.”

But employees who were responsible for collecting money from patients said the aggressive tactics went beyond the scripts provided by McKinsey. In some Providence collection departments, wall-mounted charts shaped like oversize thermometers tracked employees’ progress toward hitting their monthly collection goals, the current and former Providence employees said.

On Halloween at one of Providence’s hospitals, an employee dressed up as a wrestler named Rev-Up Ricky, according to the Washington lawsuit. Another costume featured a giant cardboard dollar sign with “How” printed on top of it, referring to the way the staff was supposed to ask patients how, not whether, they would pay. Ms. Tizon said such costumes were “not the culture we strive for.”

financial assistance policy, his low income qualified him for free care.

In early 2021, Mr. Aguirre said, he received a bill from Providence for $4,394.45. He told Providence that he could not afford to pay.

Providence sent his account to Harris & Harris, a debt collection company. Mr. Aguirre said that Harris & Harris employees had called him repeatedly for weeks and that the ordeal made him wary of going to Providence again.

“I try my best not to go to their emergency room even though my daughters have gotten sick, and I got sick,” Mr. Aguirre said, noting that one of his daughters needed a biopsy and that he had trouble breathing when he had Covid. “I have this big fear in me.”

That is the outcome that hospitals like Providence may be hoping for, said Dean A. Zerbe, who investigated nonprofit hospitals when he worked for the Senate Finance Committee under Senator Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa.

“They just want to make sure that they never come back to that hospital and they tell all their friends never to go back to that hospital,” Mr. Zerbe said.

The Everett Daily Herald, Providence forgave her bill and refunded the payments she had made.

In June, she got another letter from Providence. This one asked her to donate money to the hospital: “No gift is too small to make a meaningful impact.”

In 2019, Vanessa Weller, a single mother who is a manager at a Wendy’s restaurant in Anchorage, went to Providence Alaska Medical Center, the state’s largest hospital.

She was 24 weeks pregnant and experiencing severe abdominal pains. “Let this just be cramps,” she recalled telling herself.

Ms. Weller was in labor. She gave birth via cesarean section to a boy who weighed barely a pound. She named him Isaiah. As she was lying in bed, pain radiating across her abdomen, she said, a hospital employee asked how she would like to pay. She replied that she had applied for Medicaid, which she hoped would cover the bill.

After five days in the hospital, Isaiah died.

Then Ms. Weller got caught up in Providence’s new, revenue-boosting policies.

The phone calls began about a month after she left the hospital. Ms. Weller remembers panicking when Providence employees told her what she owed: $125,000, or about four times her annual salary.

She said she had repeatedly told Providence that she was already stretched thin as a single mother with a toddler. Providence’s representatives asked if she could pay half the amount. On later calls, she said, she was offered a payment plan.

“It was like they were following some script,” she said. “Like robots.”

Later that year, a Providence executive questioned why Ms. Weller had a balance, given her low income, according to emails disclosed in Washington’s litigation with Providence. A colleague replied that her debts previously would have been forgiven but that Providence’s new policy meant that “balances after Medicaid are being excluded from presumptive charity process.”

Ms. Weller said she had to change her phone number to make the calls stop. Her credit score plummeted from a decent 650 to a lousy 400. She has not paid any of her bill.

Susan C. Beachy and Beena Raghavendran contributed research.

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ADDING MULTIMEDIA Cornerstone Building Brands CEO Rose Lee Named 2022 Pinnacle Award Recipient by Asian American Business Development Center

CARY, N.C.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Cornerstone Building Brands, the largest manufacturer of exterior building products in North America, today announced that President and CEO Rose Lee was named a 2022 Pinnacle Award recipient by the Asian American Business Development Center (AABDC). The Pinnacle Award recognizes individuals widely acknowledged as leaders in their fields and at the top of their professional careers. It is the highest honor of the AABDC’s annual Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business Awards program. As a Pinnacle Award recipient, Lee joins a prestigious group of more than 30 prominent Asian American business leaders who have been recognized since the award’s inception in 2004.

“It is a tremendous honor to be recognized alongside such accomplished peers. As the AABDC marks its 21st anniversary, this award underscores the dedication and impact of Asian American business leaders across many industries,” said Lee. “I draw strength from this community as I work to ensure the continued success of Cornerstone Building Brands and advance the contribution and visibility of Asian American business leaders. I also congratulate my fellow Pinnacle Award winner, Reshma Kewalramani, and all the 2022 Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business Award recipients.”

“Rose Lee is an accomplished member of a select group of CEOs who are not just Asian Americans, but also female. Rose is accustomed to being one of the few, whether as an aerospace engineer or steadily rising through the business leadership ranks in manufacturing industries traditionally dominated by men,” said John Wang, founder and president of the Asian American Business Development Center. “AABDC is pleased to have selected Rose for the Pinnacle Award in 2022. I know she works tirelessly to shine in her leadership role while striving to close the gender gap in her industry and to promote a workplace that is diverse and equitable.”

Lee has served as President and CEO and a member of the board of directors of Cornerstone Building Brands since September 2021. Lee is the first female Korean American CEO of a Fortune 1000 company and will chair The Manufacturing Institute’s Women MAKE America Initiative in 2023, where she currently serves as vice chair. She is also an independent board member of Honeywell and was recently named to the National Association of Manufacturers board of directors.

Prior to joining Cornerstone Building Brands, Lee was President of DuPont Water & Protection reporting segment. Earlier in her career, Lee held senior leadership positions at Saint-Gobain, Booz Allen & Hamilton and Pratt & Whitney.

About Asian American Business Development Center (AABDC)

The Asian American Business Development Center, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization established in 1994. It assists Asian American businesses in strengthening their capacity to compete in the mainstream market, to expand business opportunities and to promote recognition of Asian American businesses’ contributions to the general economy.

About Cornerstone Building Brands

Cornerstone Building Brands is the largest manufacturer of exterior building products by sales for residential and low-rise non-residential buildings in North America. Headquartered in Cary, N.C., we serve residential and commercial customers across the new construction and repair and remodel markets. Our market-leading portfolio of products spans vinyl windows, vinyl siding, stone veneer, metal roofing, metal wall systems and metal accessories. Cornerstone Building Brands’ broad, multichannel distribution platform and expansive national footprint includes more than 20,000 employees at manufacturing, distribution and office locations throughout North America. Corporate stewardship and environmental, social and governance (ESG) responsibility are embedded in our culture. We are committed to contributing positively to the communities where we live, work and play. For more information, visit us at www.cornerstonebuildingbrands.com.

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Core & Main Signs Agreement to Acquire Distributors, Inc.

ST. LOUIS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Core & Main, Inc. (NYSE: CNM), a leading specialized distributor of water, wastewater, storm drainage and fire protection products, and related services, has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire substantially all of the assets of Distributors, Inc., a full-service distributor of fire protection products, based in Hawaii.

“By consistently meeting and exceeding customer expectations, Distributors, Inc. has established itself as a leader in fire protection services in Hawaii. The extensive knowledge and experience of our combined resources strengthen this position, and this strategic acquisition enables us to continue adding value to their customers,” said Steve LeClair, chief executive officer of Core & Main.

“Distributors, Inc. is a trusted player in fire protection with a stellar reputation,” said Brad Cowles, president of Core & Main. “Their partnership approach to working with customers makes them a good fit for us. I look forward to working with them and continuing our growth together.”

Established in 2018, Distributors, Inc. provides fire protection contractors throughout Hawaii with quality products and fabrication services for new fire protection systems and the maintenance and repair of existing systems. Its facility is located in Honolulu, Hawaii.

“Distributors, Inc. is proud of having an exceptional reputation for producing results for our customers. Our team is successful because of our service, quality products and extensive expertise,” said Tyler Nekoba, president of Distributors, Inc. “Core & Main takes a like-minded approach. Their dedication to integrity, community and family-oriented culture aligns well with ours. We are excited to join the Core & Main family.”

About Core & Main

Based in St. Louis, Core & Main is a leading specialized distributor of water, wastewater, storm drainage and fire protection products, and related services, to municipalities, private water companies and professional contractors across municipal, non-residential and residential end markets nationwide. With approximately 300 locations, the company provides its customers with local expertise backed by a national supply chain. Core & Main’s 4,100 associates are committed to helping their communities thrive with safe and sustainable infrastructure. Visit coreandmain.com to learn more.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this press release include “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Examples of forward-looking statements include information concerning Core & Main’s financial and operating outlook, as well as any other statement that does not directly relate to any historical or current fact. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “could,” “should,” “forecasts,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “projects,” “outlook,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue,” “preliminary,” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we can give you no assurance these expectations will prove to have been correct. These forward-looking statements relate to future events or our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements to differ materially from any future results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

Additional information concerning these and other factors can be found in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the foregoing cautionary statements. All such statements speak only as of the date made and, except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.

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Ukraine’s Donbas, Where Putin Sowed the Seeds of War

CHASIV YAR, Ukraine — On a clear spring morning eight years ago, Oleksandr Khainus stepped outside his house to go to work at the town factory when he spotted new graffiti scrawled across his fence. “Glory to Russia,” vandals had written in angry black spray paint. “Putin,” another message said.

Mr. Khainus was perplexed. It was true that Chasiv Yar, the Rust Belt-like town where he has spent his entire life in a region called the Donbas, had long contained many conflicting opinions on its identity. Geographically, the Donbas was part of Ukraine, no question, but it was so close to Russia and so tied to it historically that many maintained that their true home really lay eastward.

“It was the type of stuff you’d argue about over the dinner table,” he said. “But nothing that anyone would get violent over.”

protests exploded. Armed separatists seized chunks of the Donbas right under the authorities’ noses. Two so-called People’s Republics were declared. Russian troops stormed in.

the most far-reaching war in generations. It was the Donbas that became Mr. Putin’s pretext for a full-scale invasion of Ukraine. And now it is heating up again.

masterful offensive in the Kharkiv region, in Ukraine’s northeast, where town after town fell without a shot. Now they are heading south. Columns of dark green military trucks and American-made rocket launchers are thundering down the long, straight highways into the Donbas. But they will have a much harder fight on their hands.

Wagner Group and close air cover because of the proximity to the Russian border. They can also rely on separatist fighters and a well-financed network of citizen-spies who relay secret information to the invaders, often with devastating consequences.

Viktor Yanukovych, Ukraine’s pro-Russia president, out of office. Mr. Yanukovych came from a Donbas steel town. In one stroke, Russia lost its ally and the Donbas elite its godfather. That is when the trouble started.

People flooded into the Donbas streets waving Russian flags. At first, said Alisa Sopova, a journalist for a Donbas newspaper at the time, “We were sure they were fake people brought in from Russia to pose for Russian TV.”

to speak so much Russian. A critical aspect of Ukrainian independence was reviving the Ukrainian language, marginalized during Soviet times. But those arguments were typically confined to social media posts or intellectual debates, until this moment.

“I’d go into the supermarket to buy some meat, and the shopkeeper tells me, ‘If you don’t speak Ukrainian, I’m not going to sell you any meat,’” Mr. Tsyhankov said. “I’ve been speaking Russian my whole life. How do you think that made me feel?”

done something similar in 2008 in South Ossetia and Abkhazia, two regions of Georgia, and before that the Russians had meddled in Moldova, backing the breakaway Transnistria region. The tools were generally the same: bankrolling pro-Russia political parties; deploying intelligence agents to foment protests; sowing disinformation through Russian TV.

Mr. Putin’s strategy was to turn strategic slices of the former Soviet Union into separatist hotbeds to hobble young nations like Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine, all struggling to break free from Moscow and move closer to Europe.

Under the Kremlin’s wing, Donbas’s separatists killed Ukrainian officials, took territory and declared the breakaway Donetsk People’s Republic and Luhansk People’s Republic. When Ukrainian forces rolled in to quell the rebellion, some residents saw them as occupiers. They spoke a different language, hailed from a different region, embraced a different culture — or so went the pro-Russia narrative. In some villages, babushkas lay down in the roads blocking Ukrainian tanks, officers said, and in one, an especially cunning babushka kept stealing the soldiers’ helmets.

“It was frustrating,” said Anatolii Mohyla, a Ukrainian military commander. “We’d come to liberate them and they’d give us the finger.”

Mr. Putin dispatched thousands of Russian troops to support the separatists, later saying he had been “forced to protect” the Russian-speaking population. Towns like Chasiv Yar were occupied by separatist fighters, then liberated by Ukrainian troops a few months later. By 2015, the heavy fighting had died down. But it was not like Mr. Putin forgot about the Donbas.

He upped the ante in 2021, saying, “Kyiv simply does not need the Donbas.” And on Feb. 21 of this year, three days before he invaded Ukraine, Mr. Putin accused the Ukrainian government of perpetrating a “genocide.” He justified the most cataclysmic war in decades by citing the very tensions he himself stoked.

In early April, the agricultural land around Chasiv Yar began to thaw. Mr. Khainus, the pro-Ukraine farmer, drove out to check a sunflower field. A Ukrainian military vehicle raced up. A soldier leaned out the window and fired an assault rifle, the bullets skipping up in the dirt. Mr. Khainus slammed on the brakes.

A Ukrainian commander he recognized, a man whom Mr. Khainus said he had complained about before, jumped out. The commander greeted him with a punch to the head, Mr. Khainus said, and then smashed him in the face with a rifle butt.

He does not remember much after that. He shared photographs of himself lying in a hospital bed with two black eyes. Military and law enforcement officials declined to comment.

Mr. Khainus remains a supporter of the military, saying, “One stupid person doesn’t represent the army.”

But, he added wryly: “It’s one thing to be a patriot in Kyiv. It’s another to be a patriot in the Donbas.”

At 9 p.m. on July 9, four cruise missiles slammed into a dormitory at the old ceramic plant. The buildings crumbled as if they were made out of sand. Viacheslav Boitsov, an emergency services official, said there were “no military facilities nearby.”

But according to Mr. Mohyla and Oleksandr Nevydomskyi, another Ukrainian military officer, Ukrainian soldiers were staying in that building. The night before, they said, a mysterious man was seen standing outside flashing light signals, most likely pinpointing the position.

The military calls such spies “correctors,” and they relay navigational information to the Russians to make missile and artillery strikes more precise. Ukrainian officials have arrested more than 20 and say correctors are often paid several hundred dollars after a target is hit. The strike in Chasiv Yar was one of the deadliest: 48 killed, including 18 soldiers, the officers said.

“For sure there are Russian agents in this town,” Mr. Mohyla said. “There might even be spies in our unit.”

Few in Chasiv Yar are confident that the town will stay in government hands.

Mr. Khainus said the Russians were steadily moving closer to his sunflower fields. About a week ago, a friend’s house was shelled. A day later, in an online messaging channel, separatist supporters said Mr. Khainus should be next, calling him a “hero” — adding an epithet.

Is he scared?

“Why should I be?” he said. “They’re nobodies.”

Mr. Tsyhankov, the retired dump truck driver nostalgic for the Soviet times, seemed pained by all of the bloodshed but did not blame the Russians or the separatists. “They’re doing the right thing,” he said. “They’re fighting for the Russian language and their territory.”

As he said goodbye, insisting that his guests take with them a jug of his homemade apple juice and some fresh green grapes, he shook his head at the enormity of it. “Why can’t we be friends with you guys, the Americans?” he asked. “Politics are keeping all of us hostage.”

Every night, the horizon in Chasiv Yar lights up with explosions. Ukrainian soldiers operate here almost as if they are on enemy territory, hiving themselves off from the public, watching their backs, traveling by night in long convoys of cars with the lights blacked out, the drivers wearing night vision goggles. According to separatist messaging channels, the Wagner mercenaries have reached the outskirts of Bakhmut, a major Donbas town. As for Soledar, it is now off limits to journalists, but volunteers there trying to rescue civilians say it is as deadly as ever.

People here used to describe the Donbas in simple terms like “beautiful,” “honest,” “unbreakable” and “free.”

Now it is destroyed, depopulated, sad and empty.

“It’s like the Rust Belt,” Ms. Sopova said. “It’s not needed anymore. All that industry is obsolete.”

Countless communities have risen in the Donbas. Many are now falling. Ms. Sopova glimpses a perhaps not so faraway future where the Donbas goes back to what it once was: a wild field.

Oleksandra Mykolyshyn contributed reporting.

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TikTok’s CEO Navigates the Limits of His Power

TikTok recently tried to tamp down concerns from U.S. lawmakers that it poses a national security threat because it is owned by the Chinese internet company ByteDance. The viral video app insisted it had an arm’s-length relationship with ByteDance and that its own executive was in charge.

“TikTok is led by its own global C.E.O., Shou Zi Chew, a Singaporean based in Singapore,” TikTok wrote in a June letter to U.S. lawmakers.

But in fact, Mr. Chew’s decision-making power over TikTok is limited, according to 12 former TikTok and ByteDance employees and executives.

Zhang Yiming, ByteDance’s founder, as well as by a top ByteDance strategy executive and the head of TikTok’s research and development team, said the people, who declined to be identified for fear of reprisals. TikTok’s growth and strategy, which are led by ByteDance teams, report not to Mr. Chew but to ByteDance’s office in Beijing, they said.

increasingly questioned TikTok’s data practices, reigniting a debate over how the United States should treat business relationships with foreign companies.

On Wednesday, TikTok’s chief operating officer testified in Congress and downplayed the app’s China connections. On Thursday, President Biden signed an executive order to sharpen the federal government’s powers to block Chinese investment in tech in the United States and to limit its access to private data on citizens.

a March interview with the billionaire investor David Rubenstein, whose firm, the Carlyle Group, has a stake in the Chinese giant. Mr. Chew added that he had become familiar with TikTok as a “creator” and amassed “185,000 followers.” (He appeared to be referring to a corporate account that posted videos of him while he was an executive at Xiaomi, one of China’s largest phone manufacturers.)

Jinri Toutiao. The two built a rapport, and an investment vehicle associated with Mr. Milner led a $10 million financing in Mr. Zhang’s company that same year, three people with knowledge of the deal said.

The news aggregator eventually became ByteDance — now valued at around $360 billion, according to PitchBook — and owns TikTok; its Chinese sister app, Douyin; and various education and enterprise software ventures.

By 2015, Mr. Chew had joined Xiaomi as chief financial officer. He spearheaded the device maker’s 2018 initial public offering, led its international efforts and became an English-speaking face for the brand.

“Shou grew up with both American and Chinese language and culture surrounding him,” said Hugo Barra, a former Google executive who worked with Mr. Chew at Xiaomi. “He is objectively better positioned than anyone I’ve ever met in the China business world to be this incredible dual-edged executive in a Chinese company that wants to become a global powerhouse.”

In March 2021, Mr. Chew announced that he was joining ByteDance as chief financial officer, fueling speculation that the company would go public. (It remains privately held.)

appointed Mr. Chew as chief executive, with Mr. Zhang praising his “deep knowledge of the company and industry.” Late last year, Mr. Chew stepped down from his ByteDance role to focus on TikTok.

Kevin Mayer, a former Disney executive, left after the Trump administration’s effort to sunder the app from its Chinese parent. China was also cracking down on its domestic internet giants, with Mr. Zhang resigning from his official roles at ByteDance last year. Mr. Zhang remains involved in decision making, people with knowledge of ByteDance said.

Mr. Chew moved to establish himself as TikTok’s new head during visits to the app’s Los Angeles office in mid-2021. At a dinner with TikTok executives, he sought to build camaraderie by keeping a Culver City, Calif., restaurant open past closing time, three people with knowledge of the event said. He asked attendees if he should buy the establishment to keep it open longer, they said.

a TikTok NFT project involving the musical artists Lil Nas X and Bella Poarch. He reprimanded TikTok’s global head of marketing on a video call with Beijing-based leaders for ByteDance after some celebrities dropped out of the project, four people familiar with the meeting said. It showed that Mr. Chew answered to higher powers, they said.

Mr. Chew also ended a half-developed TikTok store off Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, three people familiar with the initiative said. TikTok briefly explored obtaining the naming rights of the Los Angeles stadium formerly known as the Staples Center, they said.

He has also overseen layoffs of American managers, two people familiar with the decisions said, while building up teams related to trust and safety. In its U.S. marketing, the app has shifted its emphasis from a brand that starts trends and conversations toward its utility as a place where people can go to learn.

In May, Mr. Chew flew to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum, speaking with European regulators and ministers from Saudi Arabia to discuss digital strategy.

June letter to U.S. lawmakers, he noted that ByteDance employees in China could gain access to the data of Americans when “subject to a series of robust cybersecurity controls.” But he said TikTok was in the process of separating and securing its U.S. user data under an initiative known as Project Texas, which has the app working with the American software giant Oracle.

“We know we’re among the most scrutinized platforms,” Mr. Chew wrote.

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Keller Williams Releases Expanded Edition of Your First Home

AUSTIN, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Keller Williams (KW), the world’s largest real estate franchise by agent count, announces the release of an expanded second edition of Your First Home: The Proven Path to Homeownership, a book that serves as a consumer guide to the adventure of home buying.

“This book is about buying your first home, and I sincerely want to encourage you to make that leap,” said Gary Keller, best-selling author and co-founder and executive chairman, KW. “What’s great about owning a home is that it can lay a solid foundation for your financial future while also setting the tone for your personal lifestyle.”

“This book’s goal is to be your trusted guide and help you know what to expect,” said Keller.

Assembled from hundreds of interviews and in-depth research with real estate agents and consumers, Your First Home is an in-depth guide on the complete process of homeownership. The book was expanded to address new trends and tools to help consumers find, finance and buy a home.

Your First Home helps readers:

“Real estate agents will tell you that helping first-time home buyers is one of the most satisfying aspects of their work,” said Keller. “They know that becoming a homeowner is a huge milestone, and they feel honored to be involved.”

Your First Home is 280 pages and is available at KellerINK.com, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other online booksellers. The book also serves as a valuable tool that real estate entrepreneurs can leverage to build their business.

A previous edition of Your First Home was published in 2008 and has sold more than 50,000 copies to date. The book was written by Keller and Jay Papasan, vice president of strategic content, KW.

Keller and Papasan are the bestselling co-authors of The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results, The Millionaire Real Estate Agent, The Millionaire Real Estate Investor, and SHIFT: How Top Real Estate Agents Tackle Tough Times.

“I love what I do and feel honored to be able to help people take ownership of their first home,” said Keller. “So, good luck on your journey. I hope it’s as smooth and enjoyable as it can be, and that you’ll be thrilled when you get there—into your first home.”

For more information and to purchase Your First Home, visit KellerINK.com. Media interviews with Papasan are available.

About Keller Williams

Austin, Texas-based Keller Williams (KW), the world’s largest real estate franchise by agent count, has more than 1,100 offices and 200,000 associates. The franchise is also No. 1 in units and sales volume in the United States.

Since 1983, the company has cultivated an agent-centric, technology-driven and education-based culture that rewards agents as stakeholders. For more information, visit headquarters.kw.com.

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PGT Innovations celebrates National Truck Driver Appreciation Week with gifts and fanfare across its family of brands

NORTH VENICE, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–PGT Innovations (NYSE: PGTI), a national leader in the premium window and door category, is commemorating National Truck Driver Appreciation Week with five days full of gifts and fanfare for team members across its family of brands.

The annual holiday is September 11 through September 17 this year and celebrates the hard work and commitment of the 3.6 million truck drivers across the country who deliver the goods and resources that keep our nation moving forward, as well as keep our highways safe.

PGT Innovations is proud to have 158 Class A CDL truck drivers who deliver products from its family of brands to businesses and construction sites across the country. Since the start of 2022, the company’s team of dedicated drivers have covered over 3.5 million miles.

To show their appreciation, PGT Innovations will be thanking their drivers with goodie bags, coffee, and donuts on Monday; with snacks, drinks, a certificate of appreciation, and an on-site breakfast on Tuesday; with breakfast sandwiches and a PGT Innovations branded truck driver appreciation t-shirt on Wednesday; with $50 gas gift cards, snacks, and drinks on Thursday; and with two movie tickets, a coupon for free popcorn and a drink, and the driver’s car washed by area high school students on Friday.

The festivities will take place at the main manufacturing facilities for CGI Windows & Doors®, PGT® Custom Windows + Doors, Western Window Systems, Anlin Windows & Doors, Eco Window Systems®, and NewSouth Window Solutions, located in Hialeah, FL; Venice, FL; Phoenix, AZ; Clovis, CA; Medley, FL; and Tampa, FL, respectively.

“I can’t express enough how much I truly appreciate each and every one of our drivers and the culture of care they act with every day,” said PGT Innovations President and CEO Jeff Jackson. “PGT Innovations wouldn’t be where we are today without these hard-working team members who share an unwavering dedication to always driving our company forward. Our drivers have a commitment to excellence, as well as pride in their trade, and I am thankful to have these individuals as part of our PGTI family.”

PGT Innovation’s drivers are also stewards of their community – for decades, stepping forward and volunteering to travel through hurricane-ravaged areas to deliver essential, disaster-relief items to communities that have been devastated by storms. And within the past few years, they have embraced the opportunity to undergo Highway Heroes training, which taught them how to spot the signs of human trafficking across motorways and report it.

Earlier this year, PGT Innovations was recognized for its efforts to end human trafficking by the Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody by being named a founding member of the 100 Percent Club. This statewide initiative invites business owners to commit to training 100 percent of their workforce to spot instances of human trafficking through the Highway Heroes training. To date, every single PGTI driver has completed the training and is an official Highway Hero, and the company has now expanded the anti-human trafficking training to field service and sales teams.

Last year, PGT Innovations also addressed the national shortage of CDL drivers by collaborating with FleetForce Truck Driving School to offer its own in-house driver certification training course for its existing team members. Instructors from FleetForce lead the course by guiding a group of team members through a full week of classroom learning at PGT Innovations’ Venice campus, followed by three weeks of driving instruction in a controlled parking lot.

About PGT Innovations, Inc.

PGT Innovations manufactures and supplies premium windows and doors. Its highly engineered and technically advanced products can withstand some of the toughest weather conditions on Earth and are revolutionizing the way people live by unifying indoor and outdoor living spaces.

PGT Innovations creates value through deep customer relationships, understanding the unstated needs of the markets it serves, and a drive to develop category-defining products. PGT Innovations is also the nation’s largest manufacturer of impact-resistant windows and doors and holds the leadership position in its primary market.

The PGT Innovations’ family of brands include CGI®, PGT® Custom Windows and Doors, WinDoor®, Western Window Systems, Anlin Windows & Doors, Eze-Breeze®, NewSouth Window Solutions, and a 75 percent ownership stake in Eco Window Systems®. The company’s brands, in their respective markets, are a preferred choice of architects, builders, and homeowners throughout North America and the Caribbean. Their high-quality products are available in custom and standard sizes with massive dimensions that allow for unlimited design possibilities in residential, multi-family, and commercial projects. For additional information, visit www.pgtinnovations.com.

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Emerson Unveils New ‘Go Boldly’ Tagline and Global Campaign to Reflect Company’s Evolving Strategic Direction

ST. LOUIS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Emerson (NYSE: EMR), a global technology and software leader, today announced a new “Go Boldly” tagline and global ad campaign reinforcing the evolution of the longtime manufacturing powerhouse. Building on the company’s cultural transformation and role as a technology and software partner across essential industries, “Go Boldly” spotlights the ways Emerson is helping the world’s largest companies reach their sustainability goals and optimize operations.

Through new investments, including its recent transaction with AspenTech, Emerson is accelerating its value creation strategy while building on its software capabilities to offer end-to-end technologies that are poised to transform industrial manufacturing and production. “Go Boldly” campaign stories showcase how Emerson is using this automation to help provide cleaner power, reduce energy emissions and enable real-time insight into plant operations across key industries through advanced software.

“Emerson is aggressively transforming our internal culture, driving a greater focus on inclusion and empowerment, while continuing to strengthen our software portfolio and helping our customers explore novel automation technologies,” said Katherine Button Bell, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of Emerson. “‘Go Boldly’ is an invitation to join us in making the world healthier, safer, smarter and more sustainable through innovation and our deep industry knowledge.”

Emerson’s new “Go Boldly” campaign was developed in partnership with DDB Worldwide and replaces the company’s longstanding “Consider It Solved” tagline. The campaign will debut across global multimedia vehicles including CNBC, Financial Times, Bloomberg, Wall Street Journal and Harvard Business Review.

As part of the new campaign, Emerson is also introducing its own seven-note “sonic logo” that can be integrated into any future Emerson music tracks. This new musical motif gives Emerson a distinctive, ownable and memorable sound.

For more information, visit Emerson.com/GoBoldly.

About Emerson

Emerson (NYSE: EMR), headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri (USA), is a global technology and software company providing innovative solutions for customers in industrial, commercial and residential markets. A leader in industrial automation, Emerson helps process, hybrid and discrete manufacturers optimize operations, protect personnel, reduce emissions and achieve their sustainability goals through its Automation Solutions and AspenTech businesses. Emerson’s Commercial & Residential Solutions business helps ensure human comfort and health, protect food quality and safety, advance energy efficiency and create sustainable infrastructure. For more information, visit Emerson.com.

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This Remote Mine Could Foretell the Future of America’s Electric Car Industry

Hiding a thousand feet below the earth’s surface in this patch of northern Minnesota wetlands are ancient mineral deposits that some view as critical to fueling America’s clean energy future.

poor environmental record in the United States, and an even more checkered footprint globally. While some in the area argue the mine could bring good jobs to a sparsely populated region, others are deeply fearful that it could spoil local lakes and streams that feed into the Mississippi River. There is also concern that it could endanger the livelihoods and culture of Ojibwe tribes whose members live just over a mile from Talon’s land and have gathered wild rice here for generations.

provoked outrage in 2020 by blowing up a 46,000-year-old system of Aboriginal caves in Australia in a search for iron ore.

at higher rates than any other racial or ethnic group in the state. Locals say the only Tesla for miles is Talon’s company car.

“Talon and Rio Tinto will come and go — greatly enriched by their mining operation. But we, and the remnants of the Tamarack mine, will be here forever,” Mr. Applegate said.

near tribal land.

approved a plan to ban the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035.

Indonesia and the Philippines, releasing vast amounts of carbon dioxide before being refined in Chinese factories powered by coal.

Another source of nickel is a massive mining operation north of the Arctic Circle in Norilsk, Russia, which has produced so much sulfur dioxide that a plume of the toxic gas is big enough to be seen from space. Other minerals used in electric vehicle batteries, such as lithium and cobalt, appear to have been mined or refined with the use of child or forced labor.

With global demand for electric vehicles projected to grow sixfold by 2030, the dirty origins of this otherwise promising green industry have become a looming crisis. The Democrats’ new tax and climate bill devotes nearly $400 billion to clean energy initiatives over the next decade, including electric vehicle tax credits and financing for companies that manufacture clean cars in the United States.

New domestic high-tech mines and factories could make this supply chain more secure, and potentially less damaging to the global environment. But skeptics say those facilities may still pose a risk to the air, soil and water that surrounds them, and spark a fierce debate about which communities might bear those costs.

can leach out sulfuric acid and heavy metals. More than a dozen former copper mines in the United States are now Superfund sites, contaminated locations where taxpayers can end up on the hook for cleanup.

canceled leases for another copper-nickel mine near a Minnesota wilderness area, saying the Trump administration had improperly renewed them.

Talon Metals insists that it will have no such problems. “We can produce the battery materials that are necessary for the energy transition and also protect the environment,” said Todd Malan, the company’s chief external affairs officer and head of climate strategy. “It’s not a choice.”

The company is using high-tech equipment to map underground flows of water in the area and create a 3-D model of the ore, so it can mine “surgically” while leaving other parts of the earth undisturbed, Mr. Malan said. Talon is also promising to use technology that will safely store the mine’s toxic byproducts and do its mining far underground, in deep bedrock where groundwater doesn’t typically penetrate.

Talon has teamed up with the United Steelworkers union on work force development. And Rio Tinto has won a $2.2 million Department of Energy grant to explore capturing carbon near the site, which may allow the mine to market its products as zero emission.

estimates, the world will need roughly 20 times as much nickel and cobalt by 2040 as it had in 2020 and 40 times as much lithium.

Recycling could play a bigger role in supplying these materials by the end of the decade, and some new car batteries do not use any nickel. Yet nickel is still highly sought after for electric trucks and higher-end cars, because it increases a vehicle’s range.

The infrastructure law passed last year devoted $7 billion to developing the domestic supply chain for critical minerals. The climate and tax law also sets ambitious thresholds for ensuring that electric vehicles that receive tax incentives are partly U.S.-made.

has begged miners to produce more.

is home to deposits of nickel, copper and cobalt, which were formed 1.1 billion years ago from a volcano that spewed out miles of liquid magma.

Talon has leased 31,000 acres of land in the area, covering an 11-mile geological feature deep under the swamp. The company has zealously drilled and examined the underground resources along one of those 11 miles, and discovered several other potential satellite deposits.

In August, the company announced that it had also acquired land in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to explore for more nickel.

Talon will start Minnesota’s environmental review process within a few months, and the company says it anticipates a straightforward review. But legal challenges for proposed mines can regularly stretch to a decade or more, and some living near the project say they will do what they can to fight the mine.

Elizabeth Skinaway and her sister, Jean Skinaway-Lawrence, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Minnesota Chippewa, are especially concerned about damage to the wild rice, which Ms. Skinaway has been gathering in lakes several miles from the proposed mine for 43 years.

Ms. Skinaway acknowledges the need to combat climate change, which also threatens the rice. But she sees little justice in using the same kind of profit-driven, extractive industry that she said had long plundered native lands and damaged the global environment.

“The wild rice, the gift from the creator, that’s going to be gone, from the sulfide that’s going to leach into the river and the lakes,” she said. “It’s just a really scary thought.”

“We were here first,” said her sister. “We should be heard.”

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Bonaventure Appoints Veteran Real Estate Finance Executive Barry H. Bass as CFO

ALEXANDRIA, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Bonaventure, an integrated alternative asset manager focused on the development, construction, and property management of innovative lifestyle multifamily communities in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions, today announced the appointment of Barry H. Bass as Chief Financial Officer. Bass brings more than three decades of real estate finance experience to Bonaventure, having previously served as the CFO of several public and private real estate companies.

Bass, who works out of Bonaventure’s corporate headquarters in Alexandria, VA, is responsible for overseeing the finance functions of the company and its private REIT, including financing activities, financial reporting, accounting, treasury and tax. Over the course of his distinguished career, Bass served as CFO of Carr Properties, a privately held REIT, and First Potomac Realty Trust (NYSE: FPO), where he helped the office and industrial REIT complete its initial public offering.

“Barry is a proven talent with an exceptional track record, and we are thrilled to add him to our executive team,” said Dwight Dunton, founder and CEO of Bonaventure. “His broad financial expertise, deep capital markets knowledge and vast network of industry relationships will be of significant value to the company as we accelerate our growth plans, expand our investor base and introduce new product offerings. We are focused on continuing to add best-in-class talent like Barry to the Bonaventure team.”

Prior to joining Bonaventure, Bass was CFO of Holistic Industries, one of the country’s largest multi-state cannabis operators. He also served as Managing Director and Chief Business Officer at Willco Companies, a private developer, owner and manager of primarily office and flex/industrial assets in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Bass graduated from Dartmouth College with a B.A. in Government and attended the Babson Graduate School of Business.

“I’m excited to join such a great team and contribute to the growth and innovation happening at Bonaventure,” said Bass. “The company’s vertically integrated platform, entrepreneurial culture and ability to grow through development and strategic acquisitions are strong competitive advantages that position the enterprise for long-term success. I’m committed to doing all I can to help advance the company’s strategic priorities and create value for its investors and residents.”

About Bonaventure

Headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia, Bonaventure is an integrated alternative asset management company specializing in multifamily design, development, construction, asset management and property management with over 6,000 apartment units across 26 communities primarily in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States. Since its founding in 1999 by Dwight Dunton, Bonaventure has become one of the top 15 most experienced HUD developers in the nation and has completed $500 million in HUD loans and over $2.25 billion in transactions. With its focus on building enduring value through ingenuity, Bonaventure boasts a full suite of investment capabilities. To learn more, visit www.bonaventure.com.

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