went further with the riff at the next year’s ceremony.

“At work, we emphasize the 996 spirit,” he said, referring to the practice, common at Chinese internet companies, of working 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week.

“In life, we need 669,” Mr. Ma said. “Six days, six times.” The Mandarin word for “nine” sounds the same as the word for “long-lasting.” The crowd hooted and clapped.

Alibaba shared the remarks, with a winking emoji, on its official account on Weibo, the Chinese social media platform. Wang Shuai, the company’s public relations chief, wrote on Weibo that Mr. Ma’s comments had reminded him of how good it was to be young. His post included vulgar references to his anatomy.

Alibaba also gives employees a handbook of morale-boosting “Alibaba slang.” Several entries are laced with sexual innuendo. One urges employees to be “fierce and able to last a long time.”

Feng Yuan, a prominent feminist in China, said the kind of behavior described at Alibaba could create the conditions under which bullying and harassment were quietly tolerated and promoted.

“In companies where men dominate, hierarchical power structures and toxic masculinity become strengthened over time,” Ms. Feng said. “They become hotbeds for sexual harassment and violence.”

Last month, Ms. Zhou shared her rape accusation on Alibaba’s internal website. According to her account of the events, her boss told a male client who was also at the alcohol-fueled business dinner, “Look how good I am to you; I brought you a beauty,” referring to Ms. Zhou.

Boozy meals have long been widespread in corporate China, where it can be seen as offensive to refuse to drink with a superior. Three days after Ms. Zhou reported the assault to Alibaba, her boss still had not been fired, she wrote in her account. She was told that this was out of consideration for her reputation.

“This ridiculous logic,” she wrote. “Just who are they protecting?”

Elsie Chen contributed reporting. Albee Zhang and Claire Fu contributed research.

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How US Activists Are Trying to Halt the Killing of Kangaroos in Australia

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“If we’re not doing it, the cockies will blast them,” Mr. White said, using a slang term for small-scale farmers. “They won’t stop.”

In the end, the argument over Australia’s kangaroo industry has always been only partly about cruelty and only partly about animals. It is most viscerally about whose values rule.

To Mr. Pacelle, Australia’s professional hunters are justifying harm to wildlife to get paid. To Professor Wilson, animal rights activists are engaging in “imperialism” that forces their sensitivities onto others.

The case against the kangaroo business brings with it a sense of rectitude that transcends borders. The defense is provincial; it’s less moral than pragmatic. And what’s clear, at least in outback Queensland, is that while distance can deliver perspective, it can also overlook facts and oversimplify complicated truths.

The fires that sparked calls for regulation last year, for example, were concentrated in New South Wales, hundreds of miles from where Mr. White hunts. In his state, Queensland, survey data earlier this year put the kangaroo population for the three species that are harvested at 16.7 million — a far cry from endangered.

Leslie Mickelbourgh, the managing director of Warroo Game Meats, said the soccer shoes campaign was also something of a gimmick. Though neither the government nor the industry breaks down exports or total revenue by product, Mr. Mickelbourgh said that kangaroos from Surat were mostly used for meat. The animals are increasingly seen as a more ethical alternative to beef and lamb because kangaroos do not contribute to climate change by belching out methane, and because they are harvested in their habitat.

The industry’s critics, Mr. Mickelbourgh said, “don’t understand our country.”

He was sitting in an office near photos of his father, the founder of the business, with giant piles of kangaroo skins. Mr. White, who happened to stop by, was sitting on a chair next to a banner that read “think local.”

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U.S. Activists Try to Halt an Australian Way of Life: Killing Kangaroos

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“If we’re not doing it, the cockies will blast them,” Mr. White said, using a slang term for small-scale farmers. “They won’t stop.”

In the end, the argument over Australia’s kangaroo industry has always been only partly about cruelty and only partly about animals. It is most viscerally about whose values rule.

To Mr. Pacelle, Australia’s professional hunters are justifying harm to wildlife to get paid. To Professor Wilson, animal rights activists are engaging in “imperialism” that forces their sensitivities onto others.

The case against the kangaroo business brings with it a sense of rectitude that transcends borders. The defense is provincial; it’s less moral than pragmatic. And what’s clear, at least in outback Queensland, is that while distance can deliver perspective, it can also overlook facts and oversimplify complicated truths.

The fires that sparked calls for regulation last year, for example, were concentrated in New South Wales, hundreds of miles from where Mr. White hunts. In his state, Queensland, survey data earlier this year put the kangaroo population for the three species that are harvested at 16.7 million — a far cry from endangered.

Leslie Mickelbourgh, the managing director of Warroo Game Meats, said the soccer shoes campaign was also something of a gimmick. Though neither the government nor the industry breaks down exports or total revenue by product, Mr. Mickelbourgh said that kangaroos from Surat were mostly used for meat. The animals are increasingly seen as a more ethical alternative to beef and lamb because kangaroos do not contribute to climate change by belching out methane, and because they are harvested in their habitat.

The industry’s critics, Mr. Mickelbourgh said, “don’t understand our country.”

He was sitting in an office near photos of his father, the founder of the business, with giant piles of kangaroo skins. Mr. White, who happened to stop by, was sitting on a chair next to a banner that read “think local.”

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Gotchies, Gotch, Ginch, Gonch, Ginches, Gitch, Gitchies, Gaunch: Canadians’ Unmentionables.

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Back in 1998, bookstores in English-speaking Canada suddenly looked like their counterparts in France, with their windows and floor displays dominated not by novels or popular nonfiction but by dictionaries. More precisely, piles of the first edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary.

Katherine Barber, Who Defined Canadian English, Is Dead at 61]

When the article appeared online, it provoked a lot of Twitter conversation about Canadianisms, particularly over the correct term for underwear. In the first sentence of the obituary, I went with “gotchies,” which the first edition of the dictionary casts as the “diminutive of GOTCH.”

But many people had other ideas, including: ginch, gonch, ginches, gitch, gitchies and gaunch. (Forgive me if I missed some.)

Judy Gombita, a Torontonian who favors “gotchies,” finally offered this analysis: “So the word definitely BEGINS with a G and often ends with CH, but the in-between varies widely across English Canada’s regions.”

Letterkenny,” the streaming comedy series set in a fictional southern Ontario town, has taken that to new heights. While some of the (printable) terms used by its characters are standard hockey slang or Canadian English, like laneway and rez (for reserve), its writers have gone on to create their own fictional dialect.

article from Babble, an online language learning company, makes a compelling case that the fictional speech in Letterkenny is a “conlang” or constructed language like Newspeak in George Orwell’s “1984” or Nadsat, the mix of Russian and English that Anthony Burgess created for “A Clockwork Orange.”

As I wrote in Ms. Barber’s obituary, declining sales of print dictionaries mean that the Canadian Oxford has not been updated since its second edition was published in 2004.

Some, apparently younger, Twitter users posted that they had never heard some of the Canadianisms I included in the obituary. And while new Canadianisms have likely come along over the last 17 years, the fluidity of languages means that many others have just as probably fallen into obscurity. When I was growing up, the largest piece of furniture in my parents’ room that was devoted to sitting was the chesterfield. Its counterpart in my household is now getting new slip covers and no one has called it anything other than a sofa or a couch during the process.

There has been one update of sorts, however. Among the many sources Ms. Barber and her crew drew on was the Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles, which was published in 1967. It was a very different creature than the Canadian Oxford. Intended for scholars, it was essentially a collection of Canadian words going back to the arrival of English speakers in what became Canada rather than a general reference dictionary and a snapshot of Canadian English use, spelling and pronunciations at that time.

second edition of the Dictionary of Canadianisms appeared online. Its website is currently being updated, so it is currently only available in a less-than-ideal digital archived form at the moment.

Somehow, I never interviewed Ms. Barber. But her wit, good humor and enthusiasm always came through on the radio and on television. Her great passion was ballet and she was as well known in those circles as she was in the world of language.

But her sister, Martha Hanna, told me that Ms. Barber’s interest in language didn’t extend to crossword puzzles.

“She said: ‘I don’t want to spend my life thinking about how to answer these stupid questions,’” Ms. Hanna, herself a crossword enthusiast, said of Ms. Barber. “Perhaps she knew words too well to to find crosswords amusing.”


Canadian cities and towns are often impostors, doubling as other places around the world in movies and on television.

  • On Thursday, the Canadiens and the Maple Leafs met for the first time in a post season game since 1979. The Hab won 2-1, but I am not taking sides. Curtis Rush reports that the return of the playoff rivalry has been muted by pandemic restrictions. “Montreal is still known for its fashion and cuisine, flair and intimate quaintness, while diverse Toronto is known for its brashness, flashy skyline and economic clout,” he wrote. “Both fan bases claim they live in hockey’s mecca.”


  • A native of Windsor, Ontario, Ian Austen was educated in Toronto, lives in Ottawa and has reported about Canada for The New York Times for the past 16 years. Follow him on Twitter at @ianrausten.

    nytcanada@nytimes.com.

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    She Used a Male Doll in a Joke. Now She’s Accused of Sexual Harassment in South Korea

    Park Na-rae, a comedian, grabbed a male doll, placed its plastic arm between its legs and made a suggestive remark.

    By the standards of Western comedy, the stunt on her YouTube show in March would have hardly seemed offensive. But the skit became a scandal in her home country, South Korea. Legions of aggrieved young men accused her of sexual harassment. The police are investigating.

    The scandal has made headlines for weeks and has threatened to inflict lasting damage on Ms. Park’s career, two years after she became the first female comedian from South Korea to host a Netflix special.

    Her supporters say the outcry illustrates a double standard in a culture where men often brag about sexual conquests and where sexual harassment is endemic, but where women who dare to mention sex in public can be penalized.

    suggested that women use sex to get jobs. Since he was punished for inappropriate comments, they argued, Ms. Park should be called to account, as well.

    Lee Wonjae, a professor at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology who studies online, said that most of Ms. Park’s critics were not trolls from misogynistic, far-right websites, but ordinary men from mainstream society.

    Professor Lee said that many young men in South Korea — which has one of the highest gender pay gaps in the developed world — feel threatened by certain gender trends and President Moon Jae-in’s attempts to push for gender equality. These men see women as growing competitors for jobs and gaining more bargaining power in the marriage market.

    “Why are you going to support women more? Look at me: I’m doing my military service. What are you doing for me?” he said of how young men see their lot in life. “That is the message.” (Men in South Korea age 18 to 28 are required to serve in the military for about two years.)

    Sexism is deeply entrenched in South Korea. There is an epidemic of men using hidden cameras to spy on women in public restrooms and changing rooms. Misogynistic posts are a defining feature of Reddit-like forums. “It’s everyday life, this kind of gender conflict, misogyny, backlash and hatred,” Dr. Mo said.

    Park Won-soon, was one of many male politicians to be accused of sexual harassment. (He died by suicide last year.) And the Seoul authorities apologized this year after issuing guidelines that advised pregnant women to cook, clean and work on their appearances to ensure that their husbands still found them attractive.

    sentenced to prison in 2019 for raping women who were too drunk to consent to sex.

    Yet, other male celebrities and public figures have made sexist remarks without facing the kind of scrutiny faced by Ms. Park. She already had a reputation for pushing the boundaries of what female South Korean comedians can say or do. She began her 2019 Netflix special, “Glamour Warning,” by talking about her “first time doing it without a man.”

    Ms. Park resigned from her YouTube show a few days after the scandal broke. The Seoul police later said that they were investigating the harassment claims to determine whether she had broken any laws. The police did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

    OpenNet, a South Korean nongovernmental organization that advocates for internet privacy, said this month that her doll stunt did not constitute sexual harassment under policies set by the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family. The group said that she had merely tried to express female sexual identity.

    Ms. Park’s talent agency, JDB Entertainment, said that she was not available for an interview.

    In a handwritten note to her 1.8 million Instagram followers in March, Ms. Park said that it was her duty as a performer and public figure to “take responsibility” for her own acting and props. “I am nothing but sorry to the many people who trusted and supported me,” she wrote.

    Last month, she visited her grandparents for one of her other television shows, “I Live Alone,” and expressed remorse for how her stunt with the doll had caused harm to her castmates.

    “Humans are imperfect,” her grandfather, who was not named in the broadcast, said as Ms. Park burst into tears. “Don’t listen to hate.”

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    1971: German Diplomats Frustrated by Edward Kennedy’s Tardiness

    BONN, April 22 (NYT).— “Your Teddy Kennedy is a rube,” a senior protocol officer of the Bonn government said recently to an American acquaintance. The word he used means turnip in Germany. But it is also the slang equivalent of rapscallion. He did not mean it kindly.

    The diplomat was referring to the happenings last week when Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D., Mass., and his wife, Joan, descended on the federal capital with an entourage of more than 100, including the Boston Pops Orchestra.

    What annoyed the protocol official and nearly everyone else who had anything to do with the Kennedys here was their habit of showing up late for every appointment.

    The Germans in this century have not enjoyed a reputation abroad for good manners but one point of etiquette that they carefully observe is punctuality.

    So it was that Kennedy tardiness made a bad impression, not only on their official hosts but also on the German press.

    The occasion was a benefit concert at Beethoven Hall, with Mrs. Kennedy as the reader in the Pops Orchestra’s performance of Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf.”

    A critic for Die Welt of Hamburg said that she had done the job “with the voice of a long-suffering newscaster.”

    The waiting for the Kennedys in Germany began in Hamburg, where Mrs. Kennedy slept through a reception planned for her. It continued in Bonn at the town hall, where she kept Mayor Peter Kramer and his fire department band waiting 40 minutes until she showed up in blue jeans.

    Meanwhile, Sen. Kennedy was late for an appointment with Chancellery Minister Horst Ehmke, who stood for half an hour with increasing impatience at the steps of Schaumberg Palace to greet him.

    Together, the Kennedys showed up an hour late for a cocktail party given by the U.S. ambassador, Kenneth Rush, at his home in Bad Godesberg.

    Playing no favorites, they went on to appear 90 minutes late at another reception in suburban Rolansdeck. The host, Helmut Kohl, minister president of Rhineland-Palatinate, said somewhat stonily: “Kennedys were always welcome here, and that is no different today.”

    Meanwhile, Foreign Minister Walter Scheel was waiting to give the Kennedys something to eat. He waited two hours.

    Topping it all off, Mrs. Kennedy showed up late for the concert.

    An American diplomat attempted to soothe the Germans with the explanation that tardiness was “customary and planned” by the Kennedys as a means of increasing the anticipation of their audiences.

    There was only one German consolation prize for Sen. Kennedy. Bonn’s leading seeress, a Gypsy named Margarete Gussantier, who calls herself Buchela, predicted: “You will be President of America, but not yet.”

    He is reported as having replied: “I have time.”

    — The International Herald Tribune, Apr. 23, 1971.

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    Disappearing Slang and Cultural Variants: How Australian English Is Changing

    Reading your letter really resonated with me. Not because I am Asian-Australian myself, but because I undeniably have what I call a “Jewish-Australian” accent.

    Like my parents, I was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia. But nine out of ten times that I speak to someone new, they inevitably ask me “So what part of America are you from?” or “Is that an American accent I detect?” Initially reluctant to announce my Jewish identity (a symptom of minority mentality, as you mentioned in your letter), I used to rely on the excuse that I was brought up on a lot of TV, usually accompanied with an awkward laugh that begged them to accept this answer.

    Although this excuse has an element of truth to it (as a kid, I watched a lot of Nickelodeon and used words like “vacation” and “soda” as a result) it never seemed to satisfy people, who would question me further in disbelief. Eventually, I would also admit to the fact that I’m Jewish and that all my Jewish friends seem to have the same accent, and maybe that has something to do with it. This is usually when people’s eyes get really big and they start nodding their heads in more confusion, too awkward to question me further.

    While I used to get embarrassed when asked about my accent, I’ve recently come to embrace the truth and have started to simply respond, “Oh I’m not American, I’m just Jewish.” Mostly because it ends the conversation quickly. But I also think that it’s important that people understand that different cultural and religious demographics have different Australian accents and dialects, but that doesn’t make us any less Australian. Answering honestly feels like an affirmation of my Jewish-Australian identity — something that I cannot hide even if I tried, evidently because of my Jewish-Australian accent.

    — Talia Slonim

    Having lived in Hong Kong for about a decade and a half and being a moderately proficient Cantonese speaker, I can hear the accent you describe and have a theory for it.

    While the Asian-Australian accent is nothing so pronounced as the native Hong Kong-English accent, my hypothesis is that there is something in the cultural Chinese linguistics that give rise to the accent you describe. First, as you know, Chinese has very few connecting words (i.e. the verb “to go” is a single character, so there is no “to” equivalent) and Chinese is rich in single characters (or limited character phrases) that carry broad meanings. Therefore, I’m wondering if the heritage of minimal-language-for-vast-meaning is not playing out in Asian-Australians by being minimalists with word sounds? Therefore, while being fluent English speakers with Australian accents, a nod to Asian heritage comes through (perhaps subliminally) via reduced sounds per word. Just a hunch.

    — Michael Corcoran

    Now for our stories of the week:


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