targeting Napoléon Bonaparte, will also be part of a permanent exhibition.

The museum’s exact location is expected to be decided by next spring.

A memorial for victims of terrorism has existed in Paris since 1998, in the gardens of Les Invalides, where Napoléon is entombed — a fountain and bronze statue of a beheaded woman with dark, empty eyes and her head in her hands. But unlike the reflecting pools that mark the 9/11 terror attacks in New York, the Paris memorial is not widely known or visited, except by officials commemorating France’s national day of remembrance for terrorism victims on March 11.

“The nation does not forget,” Mr. Macron wrote on Twitter after laying a wreath at the statue at this year’s commemoration.

it is here to stay, said Ms. Rudetzki, who is also a member of the memorial museum advisory committee and was wounded in a terrorist bombing in 1983 that cost her the use of her legs.

The future memorial will list the names of victims of terrorism attacks in France and French victims of attacks abroad. It will cover a period starting in 1974, the year that Carlos the Jackal carried out the bombing of a Paris drugstore and when France began granting “a medal of recognition” to victims of terrorist attacks, Mr. Rousso said.

the 22 July Centre in Oslo, officials have started identifying objects and documents that could be showcased, such as text messages sent by victims, sealed court records, and poems and drawings left at ephemeral memorials.

“Terrorism, whether we like it or not, is part of our societies,” Mr. Rousso said. “Creating a museum is not a way to put the issue behind us. It is a way to make people understand it.”

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