Papyrus, saw its calls increase by 25 percent, in line with an increase of about 20 percent each year.

It is unclear, the organization says, whether this is a sign of more people experiencing more suicidal thoughts or symptoms of mental health issues, or if people now feel more comfortable reaching out for help.

Lily Arkwright confided in her friend and housemate Matty Bengtsson. A 19-year-old history student at Cardiff University, Lily was self-confident, outgoing and charismatic in public, her friends and family said, but as she went back to school in September, she began to struggle with the effects of lockdown.

She also became more withdrawn, Mr. Bengtsson said.

One evening in October, as Mr. Bengtsson and Ms. Arkwright were getting ready to see some friends, she grew upset and called her mother to say that she was coming home, Mr. Bengtsson said.

Ms. Arkwright took her own life there, a day after the birthday of her brother, one of her closest confidants.

“Lockdown put Lily in physical and emotional situations she would never have in normal times,” said Lily’s mother, Annie.

Ms. Arkwright said she hoped that growing concerns about young people’s mental health during the pandemic would prompt more of them to share their struggles and seek help.

“It’s OK for a young child to fall over and let their parents know that their knee hurts,” Ms. Arkwright said. “This same attitude needs to be extended to mental health.”

But though stigma around discussing mental health has lessened, society, too, needs to normalize talking about suicide, said Ged Flynn, chief executive of Papyrus, adding that the more comfortable people were with the subject, “the less we need help lines like us.”

People should be praised for adapting and finding resilience during these difficult times, Mr. Flynn said. “Even the need to reach out to a help-line shows resilience,” he said, adding that considering the circumstances, many people were doing “really well.”

For Mr. Morgan’s friends, the loss of a man they called confident and kind has given them a resolve. “Josh always said: One day he’s going to make it,” said his friend Sandy Caulee, 25. “At least we will — for him.”

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